George Caleb Bingham images and biography
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(1811-1879)

See also: American Art

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"George Caleb Bingham had a technical facility for painting that he developed over a remarkably short space of time. After only a few months training at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, he travelled to Europe and around the United States before settling in Missouri. In the 1830s Bingham was producing rather wooden portraits but, by 1845, his style had developed to such an extent that his work was unrecognizable. Raftsmen Playing Cards is typical of the dreamy lyricism of Bingham's mature work. With these paintings of North American frontier life, often of views of the Missouri River, Bingham focuses on everyday scenes. In an age when the camera was not widely available, Bingham provides an interesting insight into his fellow citizens in Missouri and their way of life. In 1856 he followed in the footsteps of a number of other American artists choosing Düsseldorf as a place to study. Unfortunately, on returning home, his style deteriorated due to an adoption of a dry academic technique. Eventually, Bingham moved into politics."

- From "The A-Z of Art: The World's Greatest and Most Popular Artists and Their Works", by Nicola Hodge and Libby Anson

George Caleb Bingham Images

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Oil Reproductions online

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c. 1844-49 Study of a Man Reading
1845 Fur Traders Descending the Missouri
1851-52 Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers Through the Cumberland Gap
1851-52 The County Election




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