Pablo Picasso images and biography
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Pablo Picasso
(1881-1973)

See also: Cubism; Books on Picasso; Art Critics on Picasso; Artist Links

1. Early Works

2. Blue Period

3. Rose Period

4. Beginnings of Cubism

5. Analytical Cubism

6. Synthetic Cubism

7. Between the wars

8. Picasso the legend

9. Late Works

The beginnings of Cubism

In late 1906, Picasso started to paint in a truly revolutionary manner. Inspired by Cézanne's flattened depiction of space, and working alongside his friend Georges Braque, he began to express space in strongly geometrical terms. These initial efforts at developing this almost sculptural sense of space in painting are the beginnings of Cubism.

The famous "Demoiselles d'Avignon" is often represented as the seminal Cubist work. Although its impact on later Modernism cannot be denied, William Rubin has proven that it was actually a false start of sorts that did not lead directly into the Cubist work. You can tell this from the 1907 date of the Demoiselles, while the truly proto-Cubist works begin to appear later, in 1908-09.

Picasso Proto-Cubist Images on the Web

Glass Vessels (1906)

Gertrude Stein (1906)

Self-Portrait with Palette (1906)

Nude (Bust) (1907)

Self-Portrait (1907)

The Dance of the Veils (Nude with Drapes) (1907)

Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907)

Composition with Skull (1908)

Pot, Glass and Book (1908)

Pitcher and Bowls (1908)

Green Pan and Black Bottle (1908)

Bathing (1908)

Dryad (1908)

Seated Woman (1908)

Three Women (1908)

Friendship (1908)

House in a Garden (1908)

Farm Woman (1908)

Farm Woman (II) (1908)

Flowers in a Grey Jar (1908)

Bather (1909)

Portrait of Manuel Pallares (1909)

Fruit in a Vase (1909)

Woman with a Mandolin (1909)

Nude (1909)







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