24 Renaissance Artists You Should Know About

1. Michelangelo

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, known as Michelangelo, was a central figure of the Italian Renaissance, an era marked by a surge of cultural and artistic development from the 14th to the 17th Century. Born in 1475, he was renowned for his unparalleled skill and diversity in multiple disciplines including painting, sculpture, and architecture. Among his most influential Renaissance paintings are the fantastic frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and “The Last Judgment” on its altar wall. These masterpieces, characterized by powerful depictions of the human form and the profound religious themes, have cemented Michelangelo’s legacy as an innovator who fundamentally changed the tradition of painting by emphasizing depth, dimensionality, and dramatic intensity. His incorporation of narrative complexity and psychological insight established new standards in the portrayal of the human condition, making a lasting impact on Renaissance art and beyond.

For more info, see the full Michelangelo Biography

Michelangelo Artwork

Dying Slave

Dying Slave

Milan Pieta

Milan Pieta

Interior Of The Sistine Chapel

Interior Of The Sistine Chapel

Rebellious Slave

Rebellious Slave

Snakes

Snakes

The Face of God

The Face of God
View All Michelangelo Artwork

2. Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo Da Vinci – Biography and Artwork of the Italian Polymath

Leonardo da Vinci was one of the paramount figures of the Italian Renaissance, often hailed as the archetypal “Renaissance Man” due to his multitude of talents extending far beyond his artwork. Born on April 15, 1452, in Vinci, Italy, da Vinci started his journey with art by training under the notable Florentine painter, Andrea del Verrocchio, where he honed his skills in painting, drawing, and creating sculptures. His contributions to painting during the Renaissance are legendary, noted for introducing revolutionary techniques such as sfumato and chiaroscuro, which added a realistic depth to two-dimensional paintings. His iconic works, the enigmatic “Mona Lisa” and the spiritual “Last Supper,” have solidified his place as one of the most influential painters in the history of art, each painting embodying the quintessence of humanistic depiction that defined the Renaissance. Da Vinci’s meticulous observations and recordings of the natural world, as well as his interest in anatomy and the human form, were not only significant for art but also laid the groundwork for future scientific exploration.

For more info, see the full Leonardo da Vinci Biography

Leonardo da Vinci Artwork

Mona Lisa

Mona Lisa

Manuscript page on the Sforza monument

Manuscript page on the Sforza monument

Madonna with the Yarnwinder

Madonna with the Yarnwinder

Madonna Litta (Madonna and the Child)

Madonna Litta (Madonna and the Child)

Lily

Lily

Leda and the Swan

Leda and the Swan
View All Leonardo da Vinci Artwork

3. Sandro Botticelli

Sandro Botticelli was a prominent Italian painter during the early part of the Renaissance period, renowned for his key contributions to Western art. Born in Florence around 1445, Botticelli became one of the leading painters in the workshop of Fra Filippo Lippi. He became known for his specific painting techniques that displayed both delicacy and detail, merging mythological and religious subjects with beauty. His major works, notably “The Birth of Venus” and “Primavera”, are considered iconic masterpieces of the Florentine school, exhibiting an emphasis on linear contour, compositional harmony and the idiosyncratic expressiveness of the figures. These works have become key milestones in the evolution of Italian Renaissance artwork, demonstrating an exploration beyond medieval norms to embrace sensuousness and the humanist attitude to life and art.

For more info, see the full Sandro Botticelli Biography

Sandro Botticelli Artwork

Primavera

Primavera

The birth of Venus

The birth of Venus

Primavera (detail)

Primavera (detail)

DETAIL OF St. Augustine

DETAIL OF St. Augustine

Giovanna degli Albizzi Receiving a Gift of Flowers from Venus

Giovanna degli Albizzi Receiving a Gift of Flowers from Venus

St. Augustine

St. Augustine
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4. Donatello

Donatello, born Donato di Niccol di Betto Bardi (1386 1466), was an Italian sculptor, regarded as one of the most influential artists of the Renaissance era. Although not a painter, his innovative approach to form, materials, and perspective significantly shaped the visual arts, including painting, during this culturally fertile period. Noted for his relief work, which adopted several gradations of depth instead of the traditional high or low, his continuous narrative compositions impacted narrative painting. Meanwhile, his revival of the classical figure in the round, made in freestanding sculptures, paved the way for artists to explore new forms of realism, moving away from the idealized representations of the Middle Ages. Significant works of his, like “David” in bronze and “Equestrian Monument of Gattamelata,” are considered pioneering pieces of Renaissance art for their lifelike qualities, use of perspective, and depiction of human emotion.

Donatello Artwork

David

David

Virgin And Child Between St. Francis And St. Anthony

Virgin And Child Between St. Francis And St. Anthony

David

David

Equestrian monument of Gattamelata

Equestrian monument of Gattamelata

Feast of Herod

Feast of Herod

Habbakuk ('Lo Zuccone')

Habbakuk ('Lo Zuccone')
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5. Raphael

Raphael, born as Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino in 1483, was a prominent Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. He exemplified the period’s ideals of harmonious composition, technical mastery, and sublime beauty. Renowned for his detailed visual narratives, his grand frescos in the Vatican’s Papal apartments particularly the “School of Athens” and his serene Madonnas exemplify his mastery. Raphael’s blend of the dramatic tension of the High Renaissance with classical calm and balance made fundamental contributions to European art and culture. He innovatively combined extensive preparatory sketching, careful underpainting, and delicate translucent glazing to achieve radiant color and tonal unity. His sudden death in 1520 caused widespread grief; Rome had not only lost a revered artist but a favorite son. His influence remained dominant, shaping the course of European painting for centuries.

For more info, see the full Raphael Biography

Raphael Artwork

Portrait of a Nude Woman (the 'Fornarina')

Portrait of a Nude Woman (the 'Fornarina')

St. George Fighting the Dragon

St. George Fighting the Dragon

Study Of A Sibyl For The Chigi Chapel

Study Of A Sibyl For The Chigi Chapel

St Catherine

St Catherine

Portrait Of A Cardinal

Portrait Of A Cardinal
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6. Titian

Titian, also known as Tiziano Vecellio, was an Italian painter and one of the most versatile of Renaissance artists, capable of creating masterpieces in multiple genres. Born around 1488 in Pieve di Cadore, Italy, he significantly influenced the development of Venetian art. Renowned for his innovative brushwork and bold use of color, Titian contributed to all the major areas of Renaissance art, painting altarpieces, portraits, mythologies, and pastoral landscapes with equal skill and a unique expressive power. His many works, including “Assumption of the Virgin” (1516 18) and “Venus of Urbino” (1534), firmly established him as one of the greatest painters of the Italian Renaissance who was universally acclaimed for his trailblazing interpretations of mythological themes and deep exploration of color. Titian’s mastery over color and atmospheric expression had a profound impact on subsequent generations of Western artists.

For more info, see the full Titian Biography

Titian Artwork

Angel of the Annunciation

Angel of the Annunciation

Annunciation

Annunciation

An Unknown Man in a Black Plumed Hat

An Unknown Man in a Black Plumed Hat

Apostles group

Apostles group

Assumption of the Virgin

Assumption of the Virgin

The Bacchanal of the Andrians

The Bacchanal of the Andrians
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7. Jan van Eyck

Jan van Eyck, born around 1390, was a pioneering figure in the Northern Renaissance, particularly lauded for his exquisite detail and innovative use of oil paints. Most renowned for his altarpiece “The Adoration of the Mystic Lamb” and his secular painting “The Arnolfini Portrait,” van Eyck brought a degree of realism, subtlety, and depth previously unseen in European painting. His influential techniques, including the careful layering of transparent glazes, depicted minute details, textures, and light that significantly advanced portrait painting. Van Eyck’s work served as an inspiration for subsequent generations of artists, and his advancements in the use of oil paints effectively paved the way for the artwork of the high Renaissance period.

For more info, see the full Jan van Eyck Biography

Jan van Eyck Artwork

The Ghent altarpiece

The Ghent altarpiece

The Ghent Altarpiece With Doors Closed

The Ghent Altarpiece With Doors Closed

Timotheos, Or Portrait Of A Young Man

Timotheos, Or Portrait Of A Young Man

The Thyssen Annunciation

The Thyssen Annunciation

Man With A Pink

Man With A Pink

Portrait Of Baudouin De Lannoy

Portrait Of Baudouin De Lannoy
View All Jan van Eyck Artwork

8. Albrecht Durer

Albrecht Durer was a prominent German painter, engraver, printmaker, mathematician, and theorist during the Renaissance era. Born in 1471, he significantly influenced the evolution of the Renaissance movement outside Italy, particularly in his homeland of Germany. D rer introduced the principles of linear perspective, chiaroscuro, and anatomical accuracy into Northern European art, and his prints established his reputation across Europe when he was still in his twenties. He is famously known for works like Praying Hands, Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and Melancholia I, which blended religious symbolism with detailed realism, revolutionizing printmaking by transforming it from craft into fine art. By exploring a variety of themes ranging from religious works to self-portraits and nature studies, D rer’s work demonstrated unprecedented technical skill, innovative use of form, and deep intellectual complexity, traits that have enshrined him as a towering figure in the history of Renaissance art.

For more info, see the full Albrecht Durer Biography

Albrecht Durer Artwork

Traumgesicht. Durer dokumentiert einen seiner Albtraume

Traumgesicht. Durer dokumentiert einen seiner Albtraume

Christ on the Mount of Olives

Christ on the Mount of Olives

Abduction

Abduction

Abduction Of A Woman (Rape Of The Sabine Women)

Abduction Of A Woman (Rape Of The Sabine Women)

Abduction of Proserpine on a Unicorn

Abduction of Proserpine on a Unicorn

Adam (left panel)

Adam (left panel)
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9. Caravaggio

Caravaggio Biography and Artwork

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio was a pivotal figure in the world of Renaissance painting. Born in 1571, Caravaggio was characterized by a distinctive realism and use of dramatic lighting, which brought new depth and emotional intensity to his religious and historical scenes. Caravaggio s major contribution to Renaissance painting was his unique style, known as ‘Tenebrism’ or Caravaggism , characterized by the intense contrasts between light and dark, which served to heighten the emotional impact of his works. His innovative approach to painting influenced a number of artists during his lifetime and formed the foundations for the Baroque style, having a profound impact on later artists such as Rubens, Rembrandt, and Vermeer.

For more info, see the full Caravaggio Biography

Caravaggio Artwork

The Decapitation of Saint John the Baptist

The Decapitation of Saint John the Baptist

Amor Vincit Omnia

Amor Vincit Omnia

Bacchus

Bacchus

Judith Beheading Holofernes

Judith Beheading Holofernes

Supper at Emmaus

Supper at Emmaus

The Calling of Saint Matthew

The Calling of Saint Matthew
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10. Giovanni Bellini

Giovanni Bellini was a prominent Italian painter during the Renaissance period, often hailed as the father of Venetian painting. Born around 1430, he transformed the Venetian art scene with his pioneering use of color and atmospheric effects. Taking inspiration from his father Jacopo and brother-in-law Andrea Mantegna, Bellini introduced the aspects of spatial organization and linear perspective that startled local artists. His masterpieces, like “The Feast of Gods,” exhibited splendid realism by infusing naturalism and expressiveness with the combination of light, color, and landscape. Furthermore, Bellini’s innovative techniques like the oil medium not only influenced his contemporaries like Giorgione and Titian but also shaped the future of Venetian art in the High Renaissance.

For more info, see the full Giovanni Bellini Biography

Giovanni Bellini Artwork

The Madonna of the Meadow

The Madonna of the Meadow

St Jerome with St Christopher and St Louis of Toulouse

St Jerome with St Christopher and St Louis of Toulouse

Madonna with saints

Madonna with saints

Giovanni Emo

Giovanni Emo

St. Francis in the Desert

St. Francis in the Desert

The Doge Leonardo Loredan

The Doge Leonardo Loredan
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11. Andrea Mantegna

Andrea Mantegna (1431-1506) was a prominent figure of the Italian Renaissance, noted for his mastery of perspective and detail. Working in Padua and Mantua, his work served as a link between the art of Florence and the Venetian Republic, two centers of the Italian Renaissance. Mantegna’s major contributions include meticulously detailed depictions of architectural environments, drawn with a linear perspective that gives his works an almost sculptural solidity and depth. He was also a pioneer in the use of trompe l’oeil — an artistic technique that creates optical illusions of three-dimensionality. Some of his most famous works include the frescoes in the Camera degli Sposi in Mantua and the altarpiece of the Church of San Zeno in Verona.

For more info, see the full Andrea Mantegna Biography

Andrea Mantegna Artwork

Portrait Of Cardinal Carlo De' Medici

Portrait Of Cardinal Carlo De' Medici

Camera Degli Sposi

Camera Degli Sposi

Bird On A Branch

Bird On A Branch

St. Sebastian

St. Sebastian

Adoration of the Shepherds

Adoration of the Shepherds

The Lamentation over the Dead Christ

The Lamentation over the Dead Christ
View All Andrea Mantegna Artwork

12. Filippo Brunelleschi

Filippo Brunelleschi was an Italian architect and designer recognized for his innovative approach to architecture and, more importantly, for his development of linear perspective, a technique that became pivotal in the realm of Renaissance painting. Born in Florence in 1377, Brunelleschi is renowned for his breathtaking design of the “Cupola del Brunelleschi”, the dome of the city’s cathedral, Santa Maria del Fiore; however, his contribution extended beyond architecture. His interest in perspective, mathematical proportion, and the illusion of space led to the creation of his “perspective panels”. Brunelleschi’s work with linear perspective essentially, a system that allowed artists to create the illusion of depth and volume on a flat surface was revolutionary to the manifestation of space, depth, and volume in Renaissance artwork. This set the foundation for the depiction of three-dimensional space in Western art, allowing artists to create more realistic and detailed representations.

13. Hieronymus Bosch

Hieronymus Bosch was an Early Netherlandish painter during the Renaissance period, well-known for his fantastic and often macabre paintings of demons, detailed and symbolic hybrid creatures, imaginative landscapes, and religious concepts. Born around 1450, Bosch developed a unique aesthetic characterized by a detailed and vivid illustration of the human, godly and demonic activities. One of the most acclaimed works is “The Garden of Earthly Delights” a triptych that presents a moral warning by visualizing the journey of the human soul from innocence in the Garden of Eden to damnation in Hell. Bosch’s contributions to Renaissance art include his innovative use of symbolism and narrative, and his striking depiction of humanity s virtues, vices, and visions of Hell have shaped Western cultural motifs.

Hieronymus Bosch Artwork

The Entombment

The Entombment

The Fall of the Rebel Angels

The Fall of the Rebel Angels
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14. Lorenzo Ghiberti

Lorenzo Ghiberti Biography and Artwork

Lorenzo Ghiberti was a prominent Italian sculptor and painter who played a significant role in the early Italian Renaissance. Born in Florence in 1378, Ghiberti gained recognition in his early twenties through winning a competition to design the bronze doors of the city’s Baptistery. These intricately crafted doors, known as the “Gates of Paradise,” took him 21 years to complete and are considered a masterpiece of Italian Renaissance art. Although primarily a sculptor, Ghiberti was also an accomplished painter, with his panel of ‘The Sacrifice of Isaac’ demonstrating an understanding of perspective that was revolutionary for its time. Furthermore, Ghiberti nurtured the talent of his apprentice, a young Michelangelo, significantly influencing the course of Renaissance art moving forwards. His innovations in depicting three-dimensionality on flat surfaces helped shape the evolving aesthetic of the period and have largely been carried on in Western art since.

For more info, see the full Lorenzo Ghiberti Biography

Lorenzo Ghiberti Artwork

The Gates of Paradise (East Door)

The Gates of Paradise (East Door)

Detail from the Gates of Paradise (East Door)

Detail from the Gates of Paradise (East Door)
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15. Masaccio

Masaccio, born Tommaso di Ser Giovanni di Simone in 1401, was a pivotal figure in the early Italian Renaissance who fundamentally altered the direction of Western painting. He mastered the innovative use of linear perspective, a method of creating the illusion of three-dimensional space on a flat surface, that was introduced by Filippo Brunelleschi and advanced by his contemporaries. Masaccio also demonstrated a profound understanding of light and shadow, employing chiaroscuro to give his figures a corporeal authenticity. His work, particularly the frescoes in the Brancacci Chapel in Florence, such as “The Tribute Money” and “The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden,” radically departed from the stylized gothic tradition, integrating naturalism and realism that greatly influenced subsequent generations of artists, including Michelangelo. Masaccio s impressive body of work, although relatively small due to his untimely death at the age of 26, remains a testament to his pivotal role as a founder of the Renaissance style.

For more info, see the full Masaccio Biography

Masaccio Artwork

Expulsion From The Garden Of Eden

Expulsion From The Garden Of Eden

St. Julius Slaying His Parents - St. Nicholas Saving Three Sisters from Prostitution

St. Julius Slaying His Parents - St. Nicholas Saving Three Sisters from Prostitution

Expulsion from the Garden of Eden

Expulsion from the Garden of Eden

Ss. Jerome And Augustine

Ss. Jerome And Augustine

Two Carmelite Saints

Two Carmelite Saints

Saint Jerome And Saint John The Baptist (detail)

Saint Jerome And Saint John The Baptist (detail)
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16. Piero della Francesca

Piero della Francesca was an Italian artist during the Early Renaissance who significantly contributed to the period’s revolutionary strides in painting. Born around 1415 in Borgo San Sepolcro, Tuscany, he became known for his pioneering use of perspective, scientific use of color, narrative sophistication, and serene depictions of volume and space in his artwork. Some of his most influential works include “The History of the True Cross,” “The Baptism of Christ,” and “The Flagellation of Christ,” where he skillfully integrated humanism, mathematics, and science. It was Piero’s passion for geometry and detailed observations of light that helped define Renaissance painting’s ideal of visual clarity and rationality. He is often credited for laying down the path that Leonardo da Vinci and other High Renaissance artists would later follow.

For more info, see the full Piero della Francesca Biography

Piero della Francesca Artwork

Discovery And Proof Of The True Cross

Discovery And Proof Of The True Cross

Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta

Sigismondo Pandolfo Malatesta

Death Of Adam

Death Of Adam

St. Julian

St. Julian

Constantine's Dream

Constantine's Dream

Exaltation of the Cross

Exaltation of the Cross
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17. Fra Angelico

Fra Angelico, born Guido di Pietro, was an early Italian Renaissance painter known for his devout religious faith and minimalist, almost airy, approach to painting. Born around 1400, he became a Dominican friitor (friar) in Fiesole, Italy and therefore commonly known as Fra Angelico. His most significant works include the ‘Annunciation’ and frescoes in the San Marco Monastery in Florence, which not only attest to his vivid linearity, accurate use of color and innovative approach to perspective but also mark a transition from the International Gothic style to the Renaissance style. A pioneer in early Renaissance painting, Fra Angelico’s use of light, color, and realistic depiction of space was groundbreaking, influencing generations of artists that followed. His works are also considered notable for their spiritually moving quality that combines religious themes with a more human-centered approach, a key element of Renaissance art.

For more info, see the full Fra Angelico Biography

Fra Angelico Artwork

Saint Lawrence Receiving The Treasures Of The Church From Pope Sixtus Ii

Saint Lawrence Receiving The Treasures Of The Church From Pope Sixtus Ii

The Ordination Of Saint Lawrence

The Ordination Of Saint Lawrence

Annunciation

Annunciation

Coronation of the Virgin

Coronation of the Virgin

Nativity

Nativity

Chapel of San Brizio

Chapel of San Brizio
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18. Tintoretto

Tintoretto – Artwork & Bio of the Italian Painter

Tintoretto, born as Jacopo Robusti, was a significant figure within the Renaissance painting era and one of the most famous representatives of the Venetian School. Born in Venice around 1518, he was highly influential during the Late Renaissance period. Known for his innovative use of color and the unique portrayal of light in his paintings, Tintoretto’s individual and unconventional style helped push the boundaries of High Renaissance Classicism. Among his major contributions are the lavish and dramatic paintings in the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, the speed and grandeur of his mural compositions, and notably religious works like “St George and the Dragon” and “The Last Supper”. Tintoretto radically transformed the familiar religious scenes into grand operatic shows with effective use of perspective and energetic compositions. His unique approach paved the way for the stylistic shift toward the Baroque that followed the Renaissance.

For more info, see the full Tintoretto Biography

Tintoretto Artwork

Leda and the Swan

Leda and the Swan

The Deliverance of Arsinoe

The Deliverance of Arsinoe

The Maundy (Christ Washing the Feet of His Disciples)

The Maundy (Christ Washing the Feet of His Disciples)

Vincenzo Morosini

Vincenzo Morosini

Christ at the Sea of Galilee

Christ at the Sea of Galilee

Self-portrait

Self-portrait
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19. Andrea del Castagno

Andrea del Castagno was an influential Italian painter, active primarily in Florence during the early Renaissance period in the 15th century. Born around 1419, he was known for his dramatic use of perspective and ability to integrate complex architectural settings into his works. Castagno’s innovative approach to art included his understanding of anatomy, representation of emotions, and use of light to create depth. His major works include the frescoes in Sant’Apollonia, “The Last Supper”, “The Crucifixion”, and “The Deposition from the Cross”. As a pioneering figure, Castagno greatly contributed to the development of illusionistic painting techniques, and his works significantly influenced the course of Florentine painting.

20. Filippo Lippi

Filippo Lippi Biography and Artwork

Filippo Lippi was a significant Italian painter during the early Renaissance period, born around 1406 in Florence. Known for his realistic depictions and innovative use of perspective and spatial awareness, he profoundly influenced painting techniques during the 15th century. Lippi’s major contributions to the art world include frescos in Florence Cathedral’s chancel, the Barbadori Chapel, as well as altarpieces in Prato Cathedral, all of which depict a departure from the conventional Gothic style. Instead, his work captures the earthy sensuality and human emotion indistinguishable from the new humanistic ethos of the Renaissance. His best-known artwork includes “Madonna with Child and Two Angels,” which encapsulates his distinctive narrative style and his distinct advancement of the linear perspective method.

For more info, see the full Filippo Lippi Biography

Filippo Lippi Artwork

Coronation of the Virgin

Coronation of the Virgin

Madonna and Child with Stories of the Life of St. Anne

Madonna and Child with Stories of the Life of St. Anne

Madonna and Child with Angels

Madonna and Child with Angels
View All Filippo Lippi Artwork

21. Paolo Uccello

Paolo Uccello Biography and Artwork

Paolo Uccello was an Italian painter and mathematician born in the 14th century, recognized as a significant contributor to the development of perspective during the Renaissance period. Noted for his innovative work with visual perspective, Uccello was seminal in transforming art from the medieval period’s flat, symbolic style towards a more realistic and detailed representation of three-dimensional space on a two-dimensional surface. He is most renowned for his triptych paintings of the Battle of San Romano, which brilliantly demonstrate his progressive understanding of foreshortening, linear perspective, and his precise use of geometric forms. His bold use of color and unconventional perspective testify to his unique and pioneering vision, helping redefine the approach to visual representation in Renaissance art.

For more info, see the full Paolo Uccello Biography

Paolo Uccello Artwork

The Rout Of San Romano

The Rout Of San Romano

Saint George and the Dragon

Saint George and the Dragon
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22. Pieter Bruegel

Pieter Bruegel the Elder was a significant figure in the Flemish Renaissance painting, famous for his detailed landscapes and peasant scenes (genre painting). Bruegel is often considered one of the greatest early Dutch masters, who lived between c. 1525 1569. His works, often executed with a miniaturist’s attention to detail, focus predominantly on large-scale biblical or mythological scenes, illustrating moral allegories, as well as depicting intricately rendered, ephemeral moments of everyday life in the 16th century. His contributions to Renaissance art include breaking away from the Italian influence of the time, emphasizing individualism of nature and humans, using proverbs for subjects, and contributions to genre painting, furthering it as a respected form of painting.

Pieter Bruegel Artwork

Winter Landscape with a Bird Trap

Winter Landscape with a Bird Trap

Children's Games

Children's Games

Dulle Griet (Mad Meg)

Dulle Griet (Mad Meg)

Netherlandish Proverbs

Netherlandish Proverbs

Peasant wedding

Peasant wedding

The Little Tower of Babel

The Little Tower of Babel
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23. Leon Battista Alberti

Leon Battista Alberti was a highly influential Italian artist and theorist from the early Renaissance period. Born in 1404 in Genoa, Italy, he was not only a painter but also an architect, poet, philosopher, and cryptographer. Alberti’s most important contribution to Renaissance painting was his written work “De Pictura” in 1435, which served as a guide for artists during the period. This work dissected the mathematics and science behind perspective, a tool that revolutionized painting during the Renaissance by allowing artists to depict three-dimensional space on a flat surface. The principles laid out in “De Pictura” were used by many artists of the time and played a crucial role in the development of Renaissance art, most notably by artists like Raphael and Da Vinci. Alberti himself used these techniques in his own artworks to create paintings that fully embraced the Renaissance ideals of realism and beauty.

24. Domenico Ghirlandaio

Domenico Ghirlandaio Biography and Artwork

Domenico Ghirlandaio was a crucial figure in the Renaissance art world, born in 15th century Florence, Italy. He was renowned for his contributions as a painter and mosaicist, and stood out for his narrative fresco work, recognized for capturing contemporary Florentine life and individuals in extraordinary detail. Ghirlandaio’s notable artworks include frescoes in the Sassetti Chapel at Santa Trinita and the Tornabuoni Chapel at Santa Maria Novella. Perhaps his most significant contribution, though, was paving the way for future masters; he was the teacher of the highly influential artist, Michelangelo. Through his intricate frescoes and the knowledge he passed on, Ghirlandaio played a critical role in shaping the visual and conceptual landscape of the Renaissance era.

For more info, see the full Domenico Ghirlandaio Biography

Domenico Ghirlandaio Artwork

Portrait Of An Old Man With A Young Boy

Portrait Of An Old Man With A Young Boy

Adoration of the Shepherds

Adoration of the Shepherds

The Visitation

The Visitation
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