Francesco D’este (c. 1460) by Rogier Van Der Weyden

Francesco D'este - Rogier Van Der Weyden - c. 1460

Artwork Information

TitleFrancesco D'este
ArtistRogier Van Der Weyden
Datec. 1460
MediumOil On Wood
Dimensions12 1/2 x 8 3/4 in. (31.8 x 22.2 cm)
Current LocationMetropolitan Museum Of Art, New York
Order a Custom Print of this Artwork!

About Francesco D'este

Francesco d’Este, the illegitimate son of Duke Leonello of Ferrara, is the subject of a small oil on wood panel painting by Rogier van der Weyden dating to around 1460. The portrait is in remarkably good condition and has been housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York since 1931.

Van der Weyden was one of the most influential painters during the Northern Renaissance and produced a wide range of works from secular portraits to religious triptychs and altarpieces. Francesco d’Este holds a ring and hammer in this portrait that may represent office emblems or tournament prizes; however, their significance is unclear. Additionally, due to the white background, it is thought that this painting reflects the Este family’s livery colors.

Van der Weyden’s other portraits at Burgundian court frequently reflected their sitters’ marital status changes. It remains unclear whether Francesco d’Este’s pose or expression indicates any specific meaning beyond representing both his likeness and allegorical meaning through visual cues such as his clothing, props like the ring and hammer or context clues such as who commissioned it.

In summary, Rogier Van Der Weyden’s c.1460 oil portrait of Francesco D’este has remained almost perfectly intact for nearly six centuries at The Metropolitan Museum Of Art since its acquisition while also providing insight into Renaissance portraiture under political influence as well as a valuable reflection on late medieval court life emblematic symbolism used for nobles during public appearances when holding ceremonial items like rings or hammers which can help convey hidden meanings regarding importance or status within particular societies at different times throughout history.

Other Artwork from Rogier Van Der Weyden

More Artwork from Artchive

Scroll to Top