Plate 2 (the Argument) From The Marriage Of Heaven And Hell (1790) by William Blake

Plate 2 - the Argument - From The Marriage Of Heaven And Hell - 1790 - by William Blake

Artwork Information

TitlePlate 2 (the Argument) From The Marriage Of Heaven And Hell
ArtistWilliam Blake
Date1790
MediumEtching
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About Plate 2 (the Argument) From The Marriage Of Heaven And Hell

Plate 2 (the Argument) from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, created by William Blake in 1790, is a significant work that showcases the artist’s unique perspective on good and evil. In this piece, Rintrah expresses his dissatisfaction with established theological truths, suggesting that good and evil should not be viewed as definitive concepts. Blake’s heterodox vision of Jesus Christ as an incarnation of the eternal Logos further emphasizes this sentiment.

The form of the Marriage reflects the fundamental theme of the “whole” man, exploring contrariety as a key element in human experience. Plate 2 illustrates this concept by presenting images of demons challenging angels while flames and smoke billow around them. The interdependent nature of opposing forces is highlighted through imagery such as these.

In terms of chapter divisions and structure within the book, different interpretations have been suggested by scholars over time. The lack of clear delineation between chapters given less importance to structure than its overall theme juxtaposing things considered traditional opposites in man’s life such as love/hate or kindness/evilness.

Plate 2 (the Argument) from The Marriage Of Heaven And Hell represents one facet of Blake’s artistic contribution to challenging theological dogmas; It forms part of a more layered set questioning tenets at core beliefs. Such introspection comes alive through his engraved copper plates which emphasize themes like “contrariety” essential to mankind’s existence itself reflecting Blake‚Äôs belief about what makes people distinct from other creatures living on earth – learning from failures & successes alike compared to limited responses seen prevalent among rest animal species.

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