362 Francisco Goya Paintings

Francisco Goya

Francisco Goya was a Spanish painter and printmaker who is considered one of the most important artists of the Romantic era. Born in 1746 in Fuendetodos, Spain, Goya began his career as a court painter to the Spanish royalty. However, he is best known for his dark and provocative works that often dealt with themes of war, violence, and suffering. Goya's most famous works include the "Black Paintings," a series of murals he painted on the walls of his house depicting scenes of horror and despair. He is also renowned for his etchings, such as "The Disasters of War," which depicted the atrocities of the Napoleonic Wars. Goya's work had a profound influence on later artists, and he is often hailed as the last of the Old Masters and the first of the modern painters. He died in 1828 in Bordeaux, France, leaving behind a legacy of powerful and emotionally charged artwork.

1. What value?

What value?
  • Artwork Name: What value?
  • Year: 1812 - 1814
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper

2. Ferdinand VII

Ferdinand VII
  • Artwork Name: Ferdinand VII
  • Year: c.1814
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 207 x 144 cm

3. Fernando VII

Fernando VII
  • Artwork Name: Fernando VII
  • Year: 1814
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 225.5 x 124.5 cm

4. Fight with a young bull

Fight with a young bull

5. Fine advice

Fine advice
  • Artwork Name: Fine advice
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 22 x 15.4 cm

6. Fire at Night

Fire at Night
  • Artwork Name: Fire at Night
  • Year: 1793 - 1794
  • Medium: oil,tin
  • Dimensions: 50 x 32 cm

7. Foolishness of the Fools

Foolishness of the Fools

8. Four Yard Long Snake in Bordeaux

Four Yard Long Snake in Bordeaux

9. Francisca Sabasa y Garcia

Francisca Sabasa y Garcia

10. Francisco Bayeu

Francisco Bayeu
  • Artwork Name: Francisco Bayeu
  • Year: 1795
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 113 x 84 cm

11. Francisco de Cabarrus

Francisco de Cabarrus

12. Portrait of the Bullfighter Pedro Romero

Portrait of the Bullfighter Pedro Romero

13. Portrait of the Countess of Carpio, Marquesa de la Solana

Portrait of the Countess of Carpio, Marquesa de la Solana

14. Portrait of the Joaquina, nee Tellez Giron y Alfonso Pimental, 10th Marquesa de Santa Cruz as the Muse, Euterpe

Portrait of the Joaquina, nee Tellez Giron y Alfonso Pimental, 10th Marquesa de Santa Cruz as the Muse, Euterpe

15. Portrait of Victor Guye

Portrait of Victor Guye

16. Portrait thought to be Josepha Bayeu (or Leocadia Weiss)

Portrait thought to be Josepha Bayeu (or Leocadia Weiss)

17. Powder Factory in the Sierra

Powder Factory in the Sierra

18. Pretty teacher

Pretty teacher
  • Artwork Name: Pretty teacher
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.4 x 15 cm

19. Prison Scene

Prison Scene

20. Procession of Flagellants

Procession of Flagellants

21. Procession of Monks

Procession of Monks

22. The Maja and the Masked Men

The Maja and the Masked Men

23. The Marquesa de Pontejos

The Marquesa de Pontejos

24. The Meadow of San Isidro on his Feast Day

The Meadow of San Isidro on his Feast Day

25. The military and senora

The military and senora

26. The Milkmaid of Bordeaux

The Milkmaid of Bordeaux

27. The Miracle of St. Anthony

The Miracle of St. Anthony

28. The monk

The monk
  • Artwork Name: The monk
  • Year: c.1820 - c.1824
  • Medium: engraving,paper

29. The Morisco Gazul is the First to Fight Bulls with a Lance

The Morisco Gazul is the First to Fight Bulls with a Lance

30. The Old Woman with a Mirror

The Old Woman with a Mirror

31. The Parasol

The Parasol
  • Artwork Name: The Parasol
  • Year: 1777
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 104 x 152 cm

32. Abducting horse

Abducting horse
  • Artwork Name: Abducting horse
  • Year: 1819 - 1823
  • Medium: drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 25.3 x 35.9 cm

33. Absurdity Flying

Absurdity Flying

34. Absurdity funeral

Absurdity funeral

35. Absurdity of Carnival

Absurdity of Carnival

36. Accuse the Time

Accuse the Time
  • Artwork Name: Accuse the Time
  • Year: 1802 - 1812
  • Medium: brush,pen,pencil,paper
  • Dimensions: 26.3 x 18.5 cm

37. A circus queen timely Absurdity

A circus queen timely Absurdity

38. Actress Antonia Zarate

Actress Antonia Zarate

39. A Gift for the Master

A Gift for the Master

40. Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos

Gaspar Melchor de Jovellanos

41. General Jose de Palafox

General Jose de Palafox

42. Girl Listening to a Guitar

Girl Listening to a Guitar

43. Guitar Player

Guitar Player

44. Gumersinda Goicoechea, Goya's Daughter in Law

Gumersinda Goicoechea, Goya's Daughter in Law

45. Hanibal victorious contemplates Italy from the Alps

Hanibal victorious contemplates Italy from the Alps

46. He broke the pitcher

He broke the pitcher
  • Artwork Name: He broke the pitcher
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

47. Here comes the bogey-man

Here comes the bogey-man

48. Here neither

Here neither
  • Artwork Name: Here neither
  • Year: 1812 - 1815
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 15.8 x 20.8 cm

49. Highwaymen Attacking a Coach

Highwaymen Attacking a Coach

50. Pilgrimage to the Fountain of San Isidro / The Holy Office

Pilgrimage to the Fountain of San Isidro / The Holy Office

51. Queen Maria Luisa

Queen Maria Luisa

52. Queen María Luisa Wearing a Mantilla

Queen María Luisa Wearing a Mantilla

53. Queen Maria Luisa wearing panniers

Queen Maria Luisa wearing panniers

54. Ravages of war

Ravages of war

55. Ridiculous dream

Ridiculous dream
  • Artwork Name: Ridiculous dream
  • Year: c.1819
  • Medium: aquatint,drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 24.7 x 35.8 cm

56. Rise and Fall

Rise and Fall
  • Artwork Name: Rise and Fall
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21 x 15 cm

57. Robbery

Robbery
  • Artwork Name: Robbery
  • Year: c.1794
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 69 x 107.5 cm

58. Sad forebodings of what is to come

Sad forebodings of what is to come

59. Saint Ambrose

Saint Ambrose
  • Artwork Name: Saint Ambrose
  • Year: 1796 - 1799
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 190 x 133 cm

60. The Picnic

The Picnic
  • Artwork Name: The Picnic
  • Year: 1788
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 41 x 26 cm

61. The Pilgrimage of San Isidro

The Pilgrimage of San Isidro

62. The Prisoners in Chains

The Prisoners in Chains

63. The Quail Shoot

The Quail Shoot
  • Artwork Name: The Quail Shoot
  • Year: 1775
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 290 x 226 cm

64. The Rape of Europa

The Rape of Europa

65. There is a lot to suck

There is a lot to suck

66. There it goes

There it goes
  • Artwork Name: There it goes
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

67. The Repentant Saint Peter

The Repentant Saint Peter

68. There was no help

There was no help
  • Artwork Name: There was no help
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

69. The Sacrifice to Priapus

The Sacrifice to Priapus

70. Allegory of Love. Cupid and Psyche

Allegory of Love. Cupid and Psyche

71. Allegory of the City of Madrid

Allegory of the City of Madrid

72. Allegory: War or Evil

Allegory: War or Evil

73. All will fall

All will fall
  • Artwork Name: All will fall
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 14.6 x 21.9 cm

74. And his house is on fire

And his house is on fire

75. And It Cannot Be Changed

And It Cannot Be Changed

76. And they still won't go

And they still won't go

77. Antonia Zárate

Antonia Zárate
  • Artwork Name: Antonia Zárate
  • Year: c.1805
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 103.5 x 81.9 cm

78. A Prison Scene

A Prison Scene
  • Artwork Name: A Prison Scene
  • Year: c.1808 - c.1814
  • Medium: oil,zinc
  • Dimensions: 42.9 x 31.7 cm

79. Are you … Well, as I was telling you. Eh! Be careful or...

Are you … Well, as I was telling you. Eh! Be careful or...

80. Holy Week in Spain in Times Past

Holy Week in Spain in Times Past

81. How they break her barrel

How they break her barrel

82. Hush

Hush
  • Artwork Name: Hush
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.9 x 15.9 cm

83. I am Still Learning

I am Still Learning
  • Artwork Name: I am Still Learning
  • Year: c.1824 - c.1828
  • Medium: chalk,paper
  • Dimensions: 19.5 x 15 cm

84. Incantation

Incantation

85. Infante Don Sebastián Gabriel de Borbón y Braganza

Infante Don Sebastián Gabriel de Borbón y Braganza

86. It is better to be idle

It is better to be idle

87. It is Time

It is Time
  • Artwork Name: It is Time
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.9 x 21.9 cm

88. Jose Costa Y Bonells Pepito

Jose Costa Y Bonells Pepito

89. Josefa Bayeu

Josefa Bayeu
  • Artwork Name: Josefa Bayeu
  • Year: 1805
  • Medium: chalk,paper
  • Dimensions: 11.1 x 8.1 cm

90. Saint Francis Borgia Helping a Dying Impenitent

Saint Francis Borgia Helping a Dying Impenitent

91. Saint Gregory

Saint Gregory
  • Artwork Name: Saint Gregory
  • Year: 1796 - 1799
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 190 x 115 cm

92. Saint John the Baptist as a Child in the Desert

Saint John the Baptist as a Child in the Desert

93. Scene of a bullfight

Scene of a bullfight

94. Scene of Rape and Murder

Scene of Rape and Murder

95. Sebastian Martinez

Sebastian Martinez

96. Self portrait

Self portrait
  • Artwork Name: Self portrait
  • Year: 1783
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 86 x 60 cm

97. Self portrait

Self portrait
  • Artwork Name: Self portrait
  • Year: 1795
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 18.2 x 12.2 cm

98. Self Portrait

Self Portrait

99. Self Portrait

Self Portrait
  • Artwork Name: Self Portrait
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,drypoint,etching,paper

100. The Sacrifice to Vesta

The Sacrifice to Vesta

101. The same

The same
  • Artwork Name: The same
  • Year: c.1810 - c.1815
  • Medium: etching,wash,paper
  • Dimensions: 16 x 22.1 cm

102. The school scene

The school scene
  • Artwork Name: The school scene
  • Year: 1785
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 19.7 x 38.7 cm

103. The Second of May, 1808: The Charge of the Mamelukes

The Second of May, 1808: The Charge of the Mamelukes

104. The Seesaw

The Seesaw

105. The Shipwreck

The Shipwreck
  • Artwork Name: The Shipwreck
  • Year: 1793 - 1794
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 50 x 32 cm

106. The shy man

The shy man
  • Artwork Name: The shy man
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

107. The sleep of reason produces monsters

The sleep of reason produces monsters

108. The Snowstorm (Winter)

The Snowstorm (Winter)

109. The Speed and Daring of Juanito Apiñani in the Ring of Madrid

The Speed and Daring of Juanito Apiñani in the Ring of Madrid

110. A Scene from The Forcibly Bewitched

A Scene from The Forcibly Bewitched

"A Scene from The Forcibly Bewitched," created by Francisco Goya, is an artwork embodying elements of the Rococo and Romanticism movements while falling under the genre of literary painting. The artwork depicts a surreal and eerie moment where a figure, dressed in dark robes and holding a book, appears startled, glancing at a demonic entity offering a lit candle. The dimly lit background features ghostly, animalistic figures emerging from shadows, contributing to the overall atmosphere of supernatural tension and mystery. The dramatic lighting and expressive composition reflect the captivating and macabre style characteristic of Goya's work.

111. Asensio Juliá

Asensio Juliá
  • Artwork Name: Asensio Juliá
  • Year: c.1798
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 55 x 41 cm

The artwork titled "Asensio Juliá," created by Francisco Goya circa 1798, is an oil on canvas painting that measures 55 by 41 centimeters. Exemplifying the Romanticism art movement, this portrait is housed in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, Spain. The artwork portrays a solitary figure, attentively gazing to the right, bathed in a soft light that accentuates the intricate folds and textures of his clothing, which suggests a contemplative or reflective mood. The background, shaded in muted tones, provides a stark contrast that highlights the subject, thereby drawing attention to his emotive expression and the surrounding environment.

112. As Far back as his Grandfather

As Far back as his Grandfather

The artwork titled "As Far back as his Grandfather" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. It is an aquatint on paper, measuring 21.8 by 15.4 centimeters, and belongs to the genre of caricature within the renowned series "Los Caprichos." The piece, which is currently housed in Kunsthalle Hamburg in Hamburg, Germany, depicts an anthropomorphic figure with a donkey's head, hinting at themes of folly and human nature through satirical illustration.

113. Asmodea / Fantastic Vision

Asmodea / Fantastic Vision

“Asmodea / Fantastic Vision,” painted by Francisco Goya between 1820 and 1823, is an oil on canvas piece measuring 123 x 265 cm. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is a part of Goya's renowned "Black Paintings" series, created between 1819 and 1823. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, the artwork is a genre painting that vividly encapsulates Goya’s dark and enigmatic vision. In the artwork, two figures float mid-air, with one pointing towards a distant, likely symbolic, fortress. Below them, a group of people on horseback adds a dynamic element to the composition, contributing to the overall sense of mystery and unease. The subdued color palette and dramatic depiction reflect the unique and somber character of Goya’s later works.

114. Atropos (The Fates)

Atropos (The Fates)
  • Artwork Name: Atropos (The Fates)
  • Year: 1820 - 1823
  • Medium: oil,plaster,canvas
  • Dimensions: 123 x 266 cm

The artwork, titled "Atropos (The Fates)," was created by Francisco Goya between 1820 and 1823 using oil on plaster and canvas. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is part of Goya's "Black Paintings" series, which he produced from 1819 to 1823. The artwork, which measures 123 by 266 centimeters, is classified as a mythological painting and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The composition depicts the somber and enigmatic figures of the Fates from Greek mythology, rendered with dark and haunting imagery characteristic of Goya's late period.

115. Attack on a Coach

Attack on a Coach

"Attack on a Coach" is a genre painting created by Francisco Goya in 1793 during the Romanticism movement. Measuring 50 x 32 cm, the artwork is presently housed in a private collection. The painting vividly depicts a violent assault on a stagecoach, with fallen and struggling figures strewn about and an armed man standing atop the coach. The scene is set against a dramatic mountainous backdrop, capturing the tension and turmoil of the moment with striking realism. The artwork embodies Goya's intricate exploration of human conflict and the darker facets of human nature.

116. Autumn, or The Grape Harvest

Autumn, or The Grape Harvest

"Autumn, or The Grape Harvest," created by Francisco Goya between 1786 and 1787, is a genre painting rendered in oil on canvas, reflecting the Romanticism art movement. The artwork measures 275 by 190 centimeters and is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The painting depicts a vivid scene of grape harvesters, characterized by a serene rural landscape with mountains in the background. A man and a woman seated on a stone ledge are offered grapes by a child, while another woman stands behind them, balancing a basket of grapes on her head. The composition embodies the seasonal essence of autumn harvest, highlighting the simplicity and joy of rural life.

117. A Village Bullfight

A Village Bullfight

"A Village Bullfight," a genre painting by Francisco Goya, was created between 1812 and 1814 in the Romanticism art movement. Executed in oil on canvas, the artwork measures 45 by 72 centimeters and is housed at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. The artwork vividly depicts a lively bullfight scene in a village, with an engaged crowd gathered around the spectacle, capturing the intensity and excitement of the event.

118. A way of flying

A way of flying
  • Artwork Name: A way of flying
  • Year: 1816 - 1823
  • Medium: aquatint,drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 24.7 x 35.9 cm

The artwork titled "A way of flying" by Francisco Goya, created between 1816 and 1823, is an evocative piece from the Romanticism movement, rendered using aquatint, drypoint, etching, and paper. Measuring 24.7 by 35.9 cm, this caricature belongs to Goya's "Proverbs" series and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts several human figures adorned with bat-like wings, seemingly in flight, conveying a surreal and thought-provoking imagery that is characteristic of Goya's unique style and his exploration of fantastical themes.

119. A woman and two children by a fountain

A woman and two children by a fountain

The artwork, titled "A Woman and Two Children by a Fountain," was created by Francisco Goya in 1786. Executed in oil on canvas, it measures 18.5 x 3.5 cm and belongs to the Romanticism art movement, specifically categorized as a genre painting. It is currently housed in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, Spain. The painting depicts a serene rural scene, featuring a woman accompanied by two children near a fountain. The backdrop shows a modest house and a haystack, suggesting a pastoral setting. The woman is cloaked in a shawl and is gently holding one child’s hand while the other child stands beside her, seemingly engaged in carrying water vessels. The artwork captures a moment of everyday life, rendered in Goya’s distinctive style, characterized by tender realism and nuanced observation.

120. Jose Pio de Molina

Jose Pio de Molina

The artwork, titled "Jose Pio de Molina," was created by Francisco Goya between 1827 and 1828. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is classified as a portrait. The painting features a solemn figure dressed in dark attire against a muted background, characteristic of Goya's later style. The brushwork is loose and expressive, capturing the subject's pensive demeanor and lending a poignant, introspective quality to the piece. The minimal use of light and shadow further underscores the mood of contemplation and depth.

121. Juan Antonio Llorente

Juan Antonio Llorente

The artwork titled "Juan Antonio Llorente" is a portrait by Francisco Goya, created circa 1810-1812. Executed in oil on canvas, it measures 189.2 x 114.3 cm. The piece belongs to the Romanticism movement and is currently housed at the Museo de Arte de Sao Paulo (MASP) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The artwork depicts a distinguished figure adorned with a medal, standing against a minimalist background, highlighting the subject's dignified presence and emphasizing the details of his attire and expression.

122. Juan Antonio Melendez Valdes

Juan Antonio Melendez Valdes

The artwork, titled "Juan Antonio Melendez Valdes," was created by Francisco Goya in 1797. Executed in oil on canvas, the portrait measures 73.3 by 57.1 cm and belongs to the Romanticism movement. The piece is currently housed in the Bowes Museum in Barnard Castle, UK. The artwork features a detailed and expressive depiction of Juan Antonio Melendez Valdes, characterized by Goya's masterful use of light and shadow, which highlights the subject's dignified presence against a subdued background.

123. Juan Bautista de Muguiro

Juan Bautista de Muguiro

The artwork titled "Juan Bautista de Muguiro," created by Francisco Goya in 1827, exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. Executed in oil on canvas, the portrait measures 103 x 84 cm and is part of the esteemed collection of the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. In this work, Goya masterfully captures the solemn demeanor of Juan Bautista de Muguiro, who is depicted seated while holding a letter, exuding a sense of introspection and calm. The understated background and muted color palette further enhance the subject's presence and the painting's intimate atmosphere.

124. Juan Martin Diaz, Determined to

Juan Martin Diaz, Determined to

The artwork, titled "Juan Martin Diaz, Determined to" by Francisco Goya, dates from approximately 1814 to 1815 and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. This portrait displays a military figure in a poised and dignified stance, reflecting Goya's skilled craftsmanship in capturing the resolute character of his subject. The figure is adorned in a bright red uniform with intricate gold detailing, suggesting a position of rank and importance. The somber background contrasts with the luminous figure, focusing the viewer's attention on the subject's commanding presence and steadfast determination.

125. Judith and Holofernes

Judith and Holofernes

The artwork "Judith and Holofernes" by Francisco Goya, created between 1820 and 1823, is a significant oil-on-canvas piece associated with the Romanticism movement. Measuring 143.5 x 81.4 cm, this painting belongs to Goya's renowned "Black Paintings" series, which he produced during the years 1819 to 1823. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, it is categorized as a religious painting. The artwork depicts a dramatic and darkly rendered scene of the biblical figure Judith as she holds a sword over the defeated Holofernes, emphasizing themes of bravery and retribution with its intense, shadowy palette.

126. King Charles IV in Hunting Costume

King Charles IV in Hunting Costume

The artwork, titled "King Charles IV in Hunting Costume", is an oil painting on canvas created by Francisco Goya in 1799. Measuring 210 x 130 cm, this portrait is a representation of romanticism and currently resides in the Palacio Real de Madrid in Madrid, Spain. The painting depicts King Charles IV in his hunting attire, standing confidently with a rifle in his right hand and accompanied by a dog, reflecting the regal yet earthy elegance associated with hunting. The king's elaborate hunting costume is meticulously detailed, highlighting Goya's skill in portraying textures and fabrics with a sophisticated palette representative of the Romanticism movement.

127. Knife Grinder

Knife Grinder
  • Artwork Name: Knife Grinder
  • Year: 1808 - 1812
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 68 x 50.5 cm

"Knife Grinder," an oil painting on canvas by Francisco Goya, created between 1808 and 1812, is a representative artwork of the Romanticism movement within the genre painting category. Measuring 68 by 50.5 centimeters, the artwork presents a poignant depiction of a laborer engaged in the mundane yet evocative task of sharpening a knife. The composition captures the intensity and concentration of the knife grinder, highlighted by the interplay of light and shadow, demonstrating Goya's mastery in conveying the human condition through everyday scenes.

128. Lads getting on with the job

Lads getting on with the job

The artwork titled "Lads getting on with the job," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 21.9 x 15.4 cm. This piece, part of the Romanticism art movement, belongs to the "Los caprichos" series and is currently housed in a private collection. The genre of the artwork is a caricature, depicting a group of men engaged in what appears to be an idiosyncratic and possibly critical activity, characteristic of Goya's satirical and incisive style. The composition is notable for its detailed depiction of figures and expressive gestures, reflecting the artist's critical view of society and human behavior.

129. La Pena de Francia

La Pena de Francia

"La Pena de Francia," crafted by Francisco Goya between 1824 and 1828, is a history painting rooted in the Romanticism movement. The artwork is housed in the esteemed Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia. In the artwork, an evocative and somber scene unfolds with figures surrounding a person in a guillotine, highlighting the grim reality of execution and the profound emotional weight of punishment. The stark, monochromatic tones underscore the gravity of the historical moment depicted, reflecting Goya’s ability to capture intense human emotions and moral reflections through his art.

130. Self Portrait

Self Portrait
  • Artwork Name: Self Portrait
  • Year: 1815
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 51 x 46 cm

The artwork titled "Self Portrait," created by Francisco Goya in 1815, is an oil painting on canvas that exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. Measuring 51 by 46 centimeters, the piece is a self-portrait depicting the artist himself. Currently housed in the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain, the artwork is characterized by its intimate and poignant representation of Goya, featuring subdued colors and a contemplative expression against a dark background, highlighting the artist's introspective and emotional depth.

131. Self Portrait

Self Portrait
  • Artwork Name: Self Portrait
  • Year: 1824
  • Medium: ink,paper
  • Dimensions: 8.1 x 7 cm

The artwork, titled "Self Portrait," was created by Francisco Goya in 1824 and is a prime example of Romanticism. Rendered in ink on paper, the self-portrait measures 8.1 by 7 centimeters and is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The piece depicts Goya in a pensive and contemplative profile view, characterized by intricate ink lines that capture the textures of his clothing and headwear with meticulous attention to detail.

132. Self-portrait

Self-portrait

The artwork titled "Self-portrait" was created by Francisco Goya around 1790 to 1795 and belongs to the Romanticism movement. It is currently housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art (Met) in New York City, NY, US. The artwork, rendered in a detailed and expressive manner characteristic of Goya's style, depicts a self-portrait of the artist himself. Goya's intense gaze and intricate depiction of attire and texture reflect the introspective nature of his work and the Romantic emphasis on personal expression.

133. Self-portrait in the Studio

Self-portrait in the Studio

"Self-portrait in the Studio," created by Francisco Goya circa 1790-1795 in the Romanticism art movement, is an oil on canvas artwork measuring 42 x 28 cm. This self-portrait features the artist himself in his studio, presumably engaged in the act of painting. Set in the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain, the piece reflects Goya's introspective examination of his artistic identity and process. The composition is characterized by a stark contrast between the artist's dark attire and the softly illuminated background, emphasizing Goya's focused expression and the intimate setting of his creative workspace.

134. Self portrait with spectacles

Self portrait with spectacles

"Self Portrait with Spectacles," created by Francisco Goya around 1801, is an oil on canvas depicting the artist himself. Executed in the Romanticism style, the artwork measures 63 by 49 centimeters and exemplifies the self-portrait genre. Currently housed in the Musée Bonnat in Bayonne, France, the piece captures Goya with a contemplative expression, adorned in period attire, and featuring his signature spectacles, conveying both a sense of introspection and the intricate detail characteristic of his work.

135. Sharing the Old Woman

Sharing the Old Woman

"Sharing the Old Woman," created around 1810 by Francisco Goya, is a wash-on-paper artwork representative of the Romanticism movement, specifically within the genre of caricature. The artwork depicts a scene in which two men appear to be arguing over an elderly woman, whose posture and expression convey a sense of weariness and resignation. Rendered in a limited color palette, the piece employs bold contrasts and dynamic lines to portray an evocative and somewhat satirical narrative characteristic of Goya's social commentary during this period.

136. She is well pulled down

She is well pulled down

The artwork titled "She is well pulled down," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is part of the series "Los caprichos." Executed in etching on paper and measuring 21.9 by 15.3 centimeters, this piece belongs to the Romanticism movement and is characterized by its satirical and caricatured depiction of societal and human follies. Currently held within a private collection, the artwork presents a scene where one figure appears to pull down another, accentuating the dramatic and critical tone Goya is renowned for.

137. She leaves him penniless

She leaves him penniless

The artwork "She leaves him penniless," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 21.9 x 15.7 cm. Belonging to the Romanticism movement and part of Goya's "Los caprichos" series, the artwork is a caricature and is currently held in a private collection. The etching portrays a scene with a central female figure engaging with a man in a manner indicative of deception or manipulation, as suggested by the title. Accompanying figures add depth and context to the narrative, reinforcing the critical social commentary typical of Goya's work during this period.

138. She prays for her

She prays for her
  • Artwork Name: She prays for her
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.9 x 15.2 cm

The artwork titled "She prays for her," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is a drypoint etching on paper, measuring 21.9 x 15.2 cm. This piece belongs to the Romanticism movement and is part of Goya's "Los caprichos" series, classified under the genre of caricature. Currently held in a private collection, the artwork portrays three women in a dimly lit setting. The central figure, seated and illuminated, is attended by a veiled older woman and a shadowed female figure standing behind her, suggesting a moment of intimate solicitude and enigmatic interaction.

139. The Straw Manikin

The Straw Manikin
  • Artwork Name: The Straw Manikin
  • Year: 1791 - 1792
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 97 x 160 cm

"The Straw Manikin," created by Francisco Goya between 1791 and 1792, is an oil painting on canvas belonging to the Rococo art movement. This genre painting measures 97 by 160 centimeters and is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts a whimsical scene in which four women, standing in a lush outdoor setting, joyfully toss a straw manikin into the air using a blanket. The expressions and postures of the women evoke a sense of playful camaraderie against a serene, pastoral backdrop.

140. The Swing

The Swing
  • Artwork Name: The Swing
  • Year: 1779
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 260 x 165 cm

"The Swing," an oil on canvas painting by Francisco Goya created in 1779, stands as an exemplary work of the Romanticism movement. Measuring 260 by 165 cm, this genre painting depicts a charming outdoor scene showcasing a group of individuals enjoying a leisurely moment in a verdant, sunlit setting. The composition is dominated by a woman delightfully swinging from a tree branch, surrounded by children and adults who are either engaged in conversation or merrily observing the scene. The use of vibrant colors and dynamic brushwork accentuates the idyllic and joyful atmosphere, mirroring the Romanticism movement's emphasis on emotive depth and natural beauty. The artwork effectively encapsulates a moment of pastoral harmony and social interaction.

141. The Third of May 1808 (Execution of the Defenders of Madrid)

The Third of May 1808 (Execution of the Defenders of Madrid)

The artwork, titled "The Third of May 1808 (Execution of the Defenders of Madrid)," was created by Francisco Goya in 1814. As an oil painting on canvas, measuring 266 x 345 cm, it is a poignant representation of Romanticism and falls within the genre of history painting. Currently housed at the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, the painting depicts the brutal execution of Spanish insurgents by French soldiers during the Peninsular War. The stark contrast between the illuminated figure in white, symbolizing innocence and sacrifice, and the shadowy, faceless executioners underscores the tragedy and horror of the event, rendering a powerful historical narrative.

142. The Wedding

The Wedding
  • Artwork Name: The Wedding
  • Year: 1791 - 1792
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 293 x 267 cm

"The Wedding," an oil on canvas by Francisco Goya, was completed between 1791 and 1792 during the Romanticism movement. This genre painting, measuring 293 x 267 cm, is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts a bustling scene under an arched stone bridge where a group of formally dressed individuals appears to be in discussion or preparation, suggesting a moment of festivity and social gathering. The lively and dynamic composition reflects Goya's keen observation of human behavior and social interactions.

143. The worst is to beg

The worst is to beg
  • Artwork Name: The worst is to beg
  • Year: 1812 - 1815
  • Medium: etching,lavis,paper
  • Dimensions: 20.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork, titled "The worst is to beg," was created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1815. Executed in the mediums of etching and lavis on paper, it measures 20.5 x 15.5 cm and is part of the Romanticism movement. The artwork belongs to the genre of caricature and is included in Goya's series "The Disasters of War." Currently housed in a private collection, the artwork depicts a harrowing scene, characteristic of Goya's critical and somber reflections on the human condition amidst conflict and suffering. The composition features a group of desperately impoverished figures, evoking a stark and poignant commentary on the ravages of war.

144. They already go plucked

They already go plucked

"They already go plucked," an etching on paper created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is a notable artwork from the Romanticism movement. Measuring 21.8 x 15.2 cm, this caricature is part of Goya's renowned series "Los Caprichos" and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a surreal scene featuring grotesque figures and birds, illustrating Goya's critical view of contemporary society with a darkly humorous tone. The expressive lines and thematic elements exemplify the artist's unique style and his engagement with social critique.

145. The Yard of a Madhouse

The Yard of a Madhouse

The artwork titled "The Yard of a Madhouse," created by Francisco Goya in 1794, is an evocative piece rendered with oil on tin. Measuring 43.8 by 31.7 cm, this genre painting, emblematic of the Romanticism movement, portrays a somber and impactful scene within the confines of a mental asylum. The dark and foreboding atmosphere, emphasized through shadowy figures and confined spaces, reflects the tumultuous emotional states of its inhabitants. Currently residing in a private collection, this work is a poignant commentary on human suffering and the conditions of mental institutions during Goya's time.

146. They are hot

They are hot
  • Artwork Name: They are hot
  • Year: 1797 - 1798
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.9 x 15.3 cm

The artwork titled "They are hot" by Francisco Goya, created between 1797 and 1798, is an etching on paper measuring 21.9 x 15.3 cm. It belongs to the art movement of Romanticism and falls within the genre of caricature. This piece is a part of Goya's "Los caprichos" series and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a group of grim figures huddled around a table, with expressions and postures suggestive of a satirical narrative, characteristic of Goya's critical and observational style.

147. They Carried her Off

They Carried her Off

The artwork titled "They Carried her Off", created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an etching on paper, measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This piece is part of the "Los Caprichos" series and falls under the Romanticism art movement. It is classified as a caricature and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a dramatic and intense scene, rendered in Goya's signature expressive style, and showcases his ability to convey complex human emotions and social commentary through his art.

148. Bad night

Bad night
  • Artwork Name: Bad night
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.8 x 15.5 cm

"Bad Night," an etching on paper by Francisco Goya, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is part of the "Los caprichos" series. Created in 1799, the artwork measures 21.8 x 15.5 cm and depicts a caricature, emphasizing the artist's satirical approach. This particular piece is held in a private collection. The artwork portrays a haunting scene of two figures enveloped in swirling garments, set against an ominous dark background, capturing the unsettling atmosphere consistent with Goya's critical view of societal follies.

149. Bartholomew Sureda y Miserol

Bartholomew Sureda y Miserol

The artwork titled "Bartholomew Sureda y Miserol" was painted by Francisco Goya between circa 1804 and circa 1806, employing oil on canvas. It is a prime example of Romanticism and belongs to the genre of portraiture. The piece, with dimensions of 119.7 by 79.4 centimeters, is housed at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., United States. The artwork depicts a contemplative individual in formal attire, his gaze fixed intently forwards as he holds a hat adorned with a red interior, illustrating Goya's mastery in capturing human expression and presence.

150. An Heroic feat! With Dead Men!

An Heroic feat! With Dead Men!

"An Heroic feat! With Dead Men!" is an artwork by Francisco Goya, created between 1812 and 1814 using aquatint and etching on paper. This work belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is categorized under the genre of caricature. It forms part of Goya's series "The Disasters of War". The artwork starkly depicts the grim realities of war, illustrating a gruesome scene where mutilated bodies are gruesomely hanged and tied to a tree, evoking a powerful emotional response that underscores the horrors of conflict and violence. The composition is characterized by its dark, detailed etching, highlighting the raw brutality and sorrow associated with wartime atrocities.

151. Because she was susceptible

Because she was susceptible

The artwork titled "Because she was susceptible" was created by Francisco Goya in 1799 using the aquatint technique on paper. It is a caricature associated with the Romanticism art movement and is part of the "Los caprichos" series. Measuring 21.9 x 15.2 cm, the piece belongs to a private collection. The artwork depicts a woman, seated in a melancholic and contemplative posture, embodying the emotional intensity and dark themes characteristic of Goya's commentary on human follies and social issues.

152. Be quick, they are waking up

Be quick, they are waking up

The artwork titled "Be quick, they are waking up" (1799) by Francisco Goya measures 21.8 x 15.2 cm and is an etching on paper, representing the Romanticism art movement. The piece is a caricature and is part of Goya's well-known series "Los Caprichos." Presently, it resides in a private collection. The artwork portrays a scene with darkly humorous undertones, featuring two grotesque figures, one appearing to be sleeping while the other attempts to wake the figure in haste, embodying the critical social commentary typical of the series.

153. Birds of a Feather

Birds of a Feather
  • Artwork Name: Birds of a Feather
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 20 x 15.1 cm

"Birds of a Feather," crafted by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper that measures 20 x 15.1 cm. This artwork, belonging to the Romanticism movement, serves as a caricature. It portrays three figures, with one prominently holding a fan, set against a backdrop of subdued light and shadow. The detailed expressions and contrasting textures evidenced in the artwork underscore Goya's masterful technique and satirical commentary on societal vices.

154. Birth of the Virgin

Birth of the Virgin

"Birth of the Virgin," created by Francisco Goya in 1772, is a fresco that epitomizes the Romanticism art movement. This religious painting, measuring 306 x 790 cm, portrays the birth of the Virgin Mary, encapsulated by a poignant and dynamic depiction of the event. The artwork showcases a group of women delicately handling the newborn, illuminated by a rich, warm color palette that exudes a sense of reverence and solemnity. The composition and brushwork enhance the emotional depth and spiritual fervor characteristic of the Romanticism period.

155. Blind Man's Buff

Blind Man's Buff
  • Artwork Name: Blind Man's Buff
  • Year: 1788 - 1789
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 350 x 269 cm

The artwork "Blind Man's Buff" by Francisco Goya, created between 1788 and 1789, is an oil painting on canvas that exemplifies the Romanticism movement. The genre painting measures 350 by 269 cm and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts a lively scene of elegantly dressed individuals engaged in the traditional game of Blind Man's Buff, set against a picturesque, expansive landscape with mountains and a serene sky, evoking a sense of merriment and sociability.

156. Blind singer

Blind singer

The artwork, titled "Blind Singer," is an etching on paper created around 1820 by the renowned artist Francisco Goya. It falls within the Romanticism art movement and is categorized as a portrait. The piece depicts a blind musician intently playing a guitar, captured in a moment of deep emotional expression. The intricate use of line and shadow highlights the solemn and contemplative mood that characterizes much of Goya's work from this period.

157. Blow

Blow
  • Artwork Name: Blow
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.4 x 15.2 cm

The artwork, titled "Blow" and created in 1799 by Francisco Goya, is a part of the "Los caprichos" series. It uses aquatint, drypoint, and etching techniques on paper and is characterized by the Romanticism art movement. With dimensions of 21.4 x 15.2 cm, this caricature piece depicts a dark and evocative scene brimming with Goya's hallmark satirical style. The image is housed in a private collection.

158. La Tirana

La Tirana
  • Artwork Name: La Tirana
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 206 x 130 cm

"La Tirana," created in 1799 by Francisco Goya, is an oil on canvas painting characterized by its alignment with the Romanticism art movement. This portrait, measuring 206 x 130 cm, depicts a woman standing in a poised and dignified manner, draped in rich and elaborate clothing typical of the era. The artwork exudes a sense of presence and character, reflecting the artist's adept skill in capturing the essence of his subject. Currently housed in the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain, the piece stands as a testament to Goya's enduring influence and artistic prowess.

159. Little goblins

Little goblins
  • Artwork Name: Little goblins
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "Little Goblins," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This piece belongs to the Romanticism movement and is part of the "Los Caprichos" series, characterized by its caricature genre. The artwork depicts grotesque, caricatured figures, evoking a sense of the fantastical and the bizarre. It showcases Goya's skill in combining dark humor with social commentary, encapsulated within his broader critique of contemporary society. The composition features three goblin-like characters engaged in peculiar activities, set against a stark, atmospheric backdrop, highlighting Goya's mastery in evoking emotional depth and complexity through his etching techniques.

160. Look how solemn they are

Look how solemn they are

The artwork titled "Look how solemn they are" is a caricature created by Francisco Goya in 1799. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and forms part of Goya's renowned series "Los caprichos." This piece is executed using a combination of aquatint, drypoint, and etching on paper, measuring 21.9 x 15.2 cm. It is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts anthropomorphic figures with grotesque and distorted features, emblematic of Goya's critical and satirical approach to the follies and abuses of contemporary society.

161. The bagged

The bagged
  • Artwork Name: The bagged
  • Year: 1816 - 1823
  • Medium: etching,paper

"The Bagged," an etching on paper created by Francisco Goya between 1816 and 1823, is part of the "Disparate" series and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. Classified as a caricature, the artwork depicts a haunting scene of cloaked figures, their elongated forms and ghostly faces emerging from the darkness. The figures are bundled in flowing fabric, giving them an eerie, almost spectral appearance, a common characteristic found within Goya’s later works which often delve into social and political commentary through stark and dramatic imagery.

162. Love and Death

Love and Death
  • Artwork Name: Love and Death
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

"Love and Death," an etching on paper by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is a poignant example of Romanticism. Part of the "Los Caprichos" series, this artwork measures 21.5 x 15.5 cm and is presently held in a private collection. The artwork, a caricature, captures the tragic embrace of a couple, evoking themes of passion, loss, and the ephemeral nature of life. The stark contrast and dramatic composition underscore Goya's masterful use of etching to convey deep emotional and narrative complexity.

163. Loyalty

Loyalty
  • Artwork Name: Loyalty
  • Year: 1816 - 1823
  • Medium: etching,paper

The artwork "Loyalty" by Francisco Goya, created between 1816 and 1823, is an etching on paper belonging to the Romanticism movement. As part of the "Disperate" series, this caricature piece exemplifies the artist's unique style and social commentary. The scene depicted in the artwork is imbued with dark, satirical elements, showcasing a group of grotesque figures engaged in a seemingly intense and chaotic interaction, characteristic of Goya's critique of society and human folly.

164. Lunatic Behind Bars

Lunatic Behind Bars
  • Artwork Name: Lunatic Behind Bars
  • Year: 1824 - 1828
  • Medium: chalk,paper
  • Dimensions: 19.1 x 14.5 cm

The artwork, titled "Lunatic Behind Bars," created by Francisco Goya between 1824 and 1828, is a piece rendered in chalk on paper, measuring 19.1 x 14.5 cm. This caricature, hailing from the Romanticism art movement, depicts a disheveled figure confined behind wooden bars, exemplifying a sense of confinement and anguish. The piece currently resides in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, US.

165. Maja and Celestina on a Balcony

Maja and Celestina on a Balcony

"Maja and Celestina on a Balcony," created by Francisco Goya between 1808 and 1812, is an oil on canvas painting that belongs to the Romanticism movement. This genre painting, housed in a private collection, measures 166 x 108 cm. The artwork depicts a young woman, presumably Maja, leaning casually on a balcony railing while an older woman, identified as Celestina, stands beside her, engrossed in her thoughts. The contrasting expressions and attire of the two figures highlight a moment of realistic interaction, encapsulated with Goya's signature use of light and shadow.

166. Majas on a Balcony

Majas on a Balcony

The artwork "Majas on a Balcony" by Francisco Goya, created in 1808, is an oil painting on canvas that exemplifies the Romanticism movement. Measuring 193 by 124.5 cm, this genre painting depicts two young women, known as majas, leaning over a wrought iron balcony. The painting, currently housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, features the women dressed in traditional Spanish attire, engaging the viewer with their direct, contemplative gazes. Shadowy male figures in the background evoke a sense of mystery and contrast starkly with the illuminated figures of the majas, amplifying the dramatic and emotional intensity characteristic of Romanticism.

167. Manuel Godoy, Duke of Alcudia, 'Prince of Peace'

Manuel Godoy, Duke of Alcudia, 'Prince of Peace'

The artwork titled "Manuel Godoy, Duke of Alcudia, 'Prince of Peace'," created by Francisco Goya in 1801, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 180 by 267 cm. This Romanticism portrait is housed in the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. It depicts Manuel Godoy, the Duke of Alcudia, in an authoritative pose, clad in elaborate military attire, signifying his stature and influence. The background features several soldiers, horses, and a flag, enhancing the dramatic and stately ambiance of the scene. The detailed rendering and expressive use of color are indicative of Goya's masterful technique and the Romantic art movement's emphasis on emotion and individualism.

168. Should God forgive her She was her mother

Should God forgive her She was her mother

The artwork titled "Should God forgive her She was her mother" was created by Francisco Goya in 1799. Utilizing aquatint and etching on paper, it measures 21.5 x 15.5 cm and belongs to the Romanticism movement. This caricature is part of Goya's "Los Caprichos" series. The artwork depicts two female figures, one standing confidently holding a fan, while the other appears elderly and bent over, adding a sense of juxtaposition and commentary on generational differences or societal roles.

169. Sketch for The Death of Saint Joseph

Sketch for The Death of Saint Joseph

"Sketch for The Death of Saint Joseph," created around 1787 by Francisco Goya, is an oil on canvas work representing the Romanticism art movement. This religious painting, measuring 54.9 x 46.4 cm, is housed in the Flint Institute of Arts in Flint, Michigan, United States. The artwork depicts the poignant moment of Saint Joseph's death, surrounded by figures who appear to be in mourning, with ethereal cherubs witnessing the solemn scene from the heavens. The use of soft brushwork and muted colors underscores the solemnity and reverence of the moment, showcasing Goya's adeptness in capturing profound religious experiences.

170. Sketch for Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History

Sketch for Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History

The artwork, titled "Sketch for Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History," is an allegorical painting by Francisco Goya, created between 1797 and 1800. Executed in oil on canvas, the piece belongs to the Romanticism art movement and measures 42 by 32.5 centimeters. The artwork depicts a symbolic scene characterized by the presence of three nude figures, seemingly embodying abstract concepts of Truth, Time, and History. A bearded male figure, possibly representing Time, is seen with wings, holding a scythe, while another figure kneels, engrossed in writing, symbolizing the recording of events. The backdrop teems with supernatural elements, creating a dramatic tableau embodying the eternal struggle of truth and its enshrinement within the annals of history.

171. Sleep

Sleep
  • Artwork Name: Sleep
  • Year: c.1800

The artwork, titled "Sleep," is a portrait created by Francisco Goya around the year 1800. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement. The painting depicts a serene and tranquil figure in a state of peaceful repose, using soft lighting and delicate brushstrokes to enhance the sense of calm and introspection. The composition emphasizes the subject's gentle features and the subtle play of light and shadow on her form, encapsulating the emotive and expressive qualities characteristic of the Romantic era.

172. Sleep overcomes them

Sleep overcomes them

The artwork, titled "Sleep overcomes them," is an etching on paper created by Francisco Goya in 1799. Measuring 21.9 x 20 cm, it belongs to the Romanticism movement and falls under the genre of caricature. It is part of Goya's famous series "Los Caprichos" and is currently housed in the Kunsthalle Hamburg in Hamburg, Germany. The artwork depicts a scene dominated by a dark background, where several figures appear to be overcome by sleep, illustrating a moment of human vulnerability and the enigmatic nature of dreams.

173. Spanish Entertainment

Spanish Entertainment

The artwork titled "Spanish Entertainment" by Francisco Goya, created in 1825, is a lithograph on paper, measuring 30 x 41 cm. It forms part of the "Tauromaquia" series and belongs to the Romanticism movement. Housed in the Biblioteca Nacional de España in Madrid, Spain, this genre painting captures a vivid and tense bullfighting scene. Spectators encircle a bullring where multiple bulls and matadors are entrenched in dramatic action, embodying the peril and bravado associated with this traditional Spanish spectacle. The artwork exemplifies Goya's mastery in conveying intense scenes of cultural significance through lithography.

174. Squealers?

Squealers?
  • Artwork Name: Squealers?
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "Squealers?" is an aquatint and etching on paper created by Francisco Goya in 1799. It measures 21.5 x 15.5 cm and is part of the Romanticism art movement. As a caricature from the "Los caprichos" series, the artwork portrays a grotesque and eerie scene where a tormented figure covers their ears, seemingly distressed by the surrounding monstrous, bat-like creatures. The dark tones and harsh contrasts emphasize the dramatic and unsettling nature characteristic of Goya's critique on societal follies and superstitions during that era.

175. St. Bernardino of Siena preaching to Alfonso V of Aragon

St. Bernardino of Siena preaching to Alfonso V of Aragon

The artwork, titled "St. Bernardino of Siena preaching to Alfonso V of Aragon," was created by Francisco Goya between 1782 and 1783. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is categorized as a genre painting. This piece is currently located in the Basilica of San Francisco el Grande in Madrid, Spain. The painting depicts St. Bernardino of Siena passionately preaching to a gathered audience, including Alfonso V of Aragon, surrounded by lush trees and an attentive crowd, capturing a moment of profound religious fervor and eloquence.

176. St. Francis Borgia Helping a Dying Impenitent

St. Francis Borgia Helping a Dying Impenitent

"St. Francis Borgia Helping a Dying Impenitent," created by Francisco Goya in 1795, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 38 by 29 centimeters. This work embodies the Romanticism art movement and is categorized as a religious painting. It currently resides in the Valencia Cathedral in Valencia, Spain. The artwork portrays St. Francis Borgia, wielding a crucifix, as he attempts to offer spiritual aid to a dying man. The scene is imbued with dramatic tension, with dark, shadowed surroundings and a starkly illuminated window creating a poignant contrast, emphasizing the urgency and solemnity of the last rites.

177. St. Gregory the Great

St. Gregory the Great

The artwork titled "St. Gregory the Great," created by Francisco Goya in 1797, is an oil on canvas portrait that exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. Measuring 190 x 115 cm, the piece is located at the Museum of Romanticism in Madrid, Spain. In this masterful depiction, St. Gregory is shown seated and absorbed in scholarly activity, characterized by his profound, contemplative expression and the meticulous detail of his ornate ecclesiastical garments, which reflect the spiritual and intellectual depth of the subject.

178. They have flown

They have flown
  • Artwork Name: They have flown
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

"They have flown," crafted by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper, exemplifying the Romanticism movement. Measuring 21.5 by 15.5 centimeters, this caricature is part of Goya's "Los caprichos" series. The artwork depicts an eerie and fantastical scene, emblematic of Goya's critique of contemporary societal norms, featuring a woman seemingly lifted by grotesque, contorted human-like figures beneath her, illustrating his vivid and often disturbing imagination.

179. They Pare

They Pare
  • Artwork Name: They Pare
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "They Pare," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This caricature belongs to the Romanticism movement and forms part of Goya's "Los Caprichos" series. Presently, it is housed in a private collection. The artwork portrays grotesque, human-like figures engaged in an eerie act, characterized by exaggerated features and expressions, indicative of Goya's critical view of societal follies. The intricate etching technique highlights the surreal and satirical nature of the scene, utilizing stark contrasts and fluid lines to enhance its dramatic effect.

180. They say 'yes' and give their hand to the first comer

They say 'yes' and give their hand to the first comer

The artwork titled "They say 'yes' and give their hand to the first comer" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is an etching on paper with dimensions of 21.9 x 15.2 cm. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is part of the "Los caprichos" series, which is known for its satirical and critical views. This particular piece, a caricature, is held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a scene where a woman appears to be guided or led by two masked figures amidst a crowd of grotesque, masked faces, all rendered in Goya's signature dark and emotive style.

181. They Sing for the Composer

They Sing for the Composer

"The artwork, titled 'They Sing for the Composer,' was created by Francisco Goya around 1796-1797. Rendered in wash and ink on paper, it belongs to the Romanticism movement and falls within the caricature genre. This piece is part of Goya's 'Album of Madrid' series. The artwork portrays a seated composer surrounded by individuals who appear to be singing, their exaggerated expressions and postures contributing to the caricature style. The mood conveyed is both dramatic and slightly satirical, in keeping with the Romantic tendencies of emphasizing intense emotion and individualism."

182. They spin finely

They spin finely
  • Artwork Name: They spin finely
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.9 x 15.2 cm

The artwork, titled "They Spin Finely," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint, drypoint, and etching on paper. Measuring 21.9 x 15.2 cm, this piece belongs to the Romanticism art movement and falls within the genre of caricature. It is part of Goya's "Los Caprichos" series and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork humorously portrays three elderly figures engaged in the act of spinning, with exaggerated and grotesque features characteristic of caricature, reflecting Goya’s critical view of societal norms and behaviors of his time.

183. They spruce themselves up

They spruce themselves up

The artwork titled "They spruce themselves up" is an etching and aquatint on paper, created in 1799 by the Romantic artist Francisco Goya. Measuring 21.5 by 15.5 cm, this piece is a caricature and forms part of Goya's renowned series "Los Caprichos." The artwork portrays three grotesque creatures engaging in grooming activities, reflecting the artist's critical commentary on societal follies and human vanity. The use of shadow and form in the composition adds to the eerie and satirical essence of the piece.

184. They who Cannot

They who Cannot
  • Artwork Name: They who Cannot
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "They who Cannot," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper measuring 21.5 by 15.5 cm. This piece, falling under the Romanticism art movement, is a caricature that is part of Goya's "Los caprichos" series. The artwork is currently held in a private collection. The scene depicts a man struggling under the weight of two donkeys, presenting a satirical and critical view on human folly and burdens, characteristic of Goya's style and thematic focus in this series.

185. This certainly is reading

This certainly is reading

The artwork, titled "This certainly is reading," was created by Francisco Goya in 1799 and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. It is an aquatint and etching on paper, measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This piece is a caricature and is part of Goya's renowned series "Los Caprichos." The artwork depicts a figure deeply immersed in reading, surrounded by dark, shadowy forms that contribute to the dramatic and somewhat eerie atmosphere characteristic of Goya's style in this period.

186. This is worse

This is worse
  • Artwork Name: This is worse
  • Year: 1812 - 1815
  • Medium: drypoint,etching,lavis,paper
  • Dimensions: 15.7 x 20.8 cm

The artwork, titled "This is worse," was created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1815. It is a work from the Romanticism art movement and belongs to the series "The Disasters of War." The piece is a caricature executed using drypoint, etching, lavis, and paper, measuring 15.7 x 20.8 cm, and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a harrowing scene of violence and suffering, characteristic of Goya's intense and critical portrayal of the brutalities of war.

187. Those Specks of Dust

Those Specks of Dust
  • Artwork Name: Those Specks of Dust
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "Those Specks of Dust" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is part of the "Los caprichos" series and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. Rendered through the mediums of aquatint and etching on paper, the piece is a caricature with dimensions of 21.5 x 15.5 cm. The work depicts a figure wearing a tall, pointed hat, seated before a gathering of people, with an imposing figure reading from a book in the background. This artwork currently resides in a private collection.

188. Boys Climbing a Tree

Boys Climbing a Tree

"Boys Climbing a Tree," a genre painting by the eminent artist Francisco Goya, exemplifies the Romanticism and Rococo art movements. The artwork vividly depicts three boys engaged in the playful and adventurous act of climbing a tree, against a backdrop that merges natural and architectural elements. Goya's masterful application of light and shadow, combined with the detailed depiction of the boys' expressions and movements, captures a moment of innocence and lively activity, offering insight into everyday life during the period.

189. Boys playing soldiers

Boys playing soldiers

The artwork "Boys Playing Soldiers" by Francisco Goya, created in 1779, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 146 by 94 centimeters. This piece belongs to the Romanticism movement and is categorized as a genre painting. The artwork depicts a scene of youthful innocence and playfulness, where three boys are engaged in a mock military scenario. One boy, standing proudly, is dressed in a soldier's attire complete with a hat, while another boy plays a drum, and the third holds a small structure, possibly symbolizing a house. The setting, adorned with foliage and a clear sky, adds a naturalistic backdrop to the children's imaginative play.

190. Boys With Mastiff

Boys With Mastiff

"Boys With Mastiff," a masterpiece painted by Francisco Goya in 1786, is a captivating example of Romanticism that graces the halls of the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. This portrait genre artwork vividly displays two young boys engaged with a mastiff, showcasing Goya's finesse in depicting human and animal forms with emotional intensity. The boys' vibrant clothing contrasts with the mastiff's dark coat, emphasizing their bond against the backdrop of a serene landscape. The artwork exemplifies Goya's prowess in capturing the essence of his subjects through a harmonious blend of color and composition.

191. Bravissimo

Bravissimo
  • Artwork Name: Bravissimo
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "Bravissimo," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. As part of the Romanticism art movement, this caricature belongs to the series "Los Caprichos." The artwork depicts a satirical scene where animals are anthropomorphized, with a seated donkey and monkey playing a guitar to the apparent amusement of onlookers, providing a critical commentary on the folly and absurdity of societal behaviors.

192. Brigand Murdering a Woman

Brigand Murdering a Woman

"Brigand Murdering a Woman," created by Francisco Goya between 1798 and 1800, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 105.4 x 80.7 cm. As a work within the Romanticism movement and classified as a genre painting, the artwork depicts a disturbing and violent scene of a man committing an act of murder against a woman. Goya utilizes dramatic lighting and intense contrast to heighten the emotional impact of the grim subject matter. This painting is currently held in a private collection.

193. Brigand Stripping a Woman

Brigand Stripping a Woman

"Brigand Stripping a Woman," an oil-on-canvas painting created by Francisco Goya between 1798 and 1800, exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. The artwork measures 41.5 by 31.8 cm and is currently housed in a private collection. Classified as a genre painting, it depicts a dramatic and somber scene in which a brigand is seen stripping a woman, who appears distressed and vulnerable. The dark and shadowy surroundings emphasize the sense of danger and foreboding, characteristic of Goya's evocative style and the Romanticism movement's focus on intense emotion and drama.

194. Brother Juan Fernandez de Rojas

Brother Juan Fernandez de Rojas

The artwork titled "Brother Juan Fernandez de Rojas," created in 1800 by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 75 x 54 cm. This portrait, a notable example of the Romanticism movement, portrays its subject with a profound sense of realism and emotional depth. The subdued, earthy tones and the intimate focus on the figure's expression and attire reflect Goya's masterful technique and his attention to psychological detail. Currently housed in the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain, the artwork stands as a testament to Goya's distinguished contributions to portraiture within the Romantic era.

195. Bullfight

Bullfight

The artwork titled "Bullfight," created by the eminent artist Francisco Goya, is a notable piece from the Romanticism movement, categorized under the genre of genre painting. This masterpiece is currently displayed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, NY, US. The artwork vividly captures the dynamic and intense scene of a bullfight, portraying various stages of the event with intricate detail and dramatic flair, characteristic of Goya's expressive style and the Romantic era's fascination with emotion and intensity.

196. Can't anyone untie us?

Can't anyone untie us?

The artwork, titled "Can't anyone untie us?" created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 21.8 x 15.2 cm, and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. This caricature is part of the "Los caprichos" series and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts two individuals entwined in an exaggerated and somewhat tormented manner, while a large, ominous owl hovers above them. The piece is imbued with symbolic and critical undertones, reflecting Goya's commentary on the societal and cultural issues of his time.

197. Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga

Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga

The artwork titled "Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga" was created by Francisco Goya around the year 1800. This piece is part of the Romanticism movement and belongs to the portrait genre. The painting is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga standing somberly, dressed in his ecclesiastical attire, characterized by rich, red vestments. He is holding a book, likely a religious text, and is adorned with a medallion that emphasizes his high clerical status. The dark background accentuates his figure, drawing the viewer’s focus to the cardinal’s dignified and contemplative expression.

198. María Luisa of Parma wearing panniers

María Luisa of Parma wearing panniers

The artwork titled "María Luisa of Parma wearing panniers," created by Francisco Goya in 1789, is an oil painting on canvas belonging to the Romanticism art movement. This portrait measures 205 by 132 cm and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. It depicts María Luisa of Parma in a formal, elaborate dress augmented with panniers, showcasing Goya's masterful technique and attention to detail in portraiture. The regal attire, adorned with ornate embellishments, emphasizes the subject's aristocratic status, and the somber background contrasts with her dignified and poised demeanor.

199. Mariana Waldstein, Ninth Marquesa de Santa Cruz

Mariana Waldstein, Ninth Marquesa de Santa Cruz

The artwork, "Mariana Waldstein, Ninth Marquesa de Santa Cruz," is an oil-on-canvas portrait crafted by the renowned artist Francisco Goya in 1797. Measuring 142 by 97 cm, it exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. The painting is currently housed in the Louvre in Paris, France. In this portrait, the subject, Mariana Waldstein, is depicted standing outdoors, elegantly dressed in a dark, flowing garment adorned with a bright pink bow on her head, exuding grace and poise against a backdrop of a serene landscape.

200. Mariano Goya

Mariano Goya

The artwork, titled "Mariano Goya," is a portrait created by the revered artist Francisco Goya in 1827. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is currently housed at the Meadows Museum in Dallas, Texas, USA. The artwork depicts a young man with a contemplative expression, wearing formal attire, set against a dark, textured background. The contrast between the subject's luminous face and the muted backdrop highlights Goya's masterful use of light and shadow, characteristic of his portraiture during his late period.

201. Marquesa Mariana de Pontejos

Marquesa Mariana de Pontejos

"Marquesa Mariana de Pontejos," a distinguished portrait by Francisco Goya dating back to circa 1786, epitomizes the Romanticism art movement. Executed in oil on canvas, the artwork measures 212 x 126 cm and vividly captures the elegance and grace of its aristocratic subject. The composition features the Marquesa in an elaborate, ethereal gown, holding a delicate flower, set against a tranquil natural backdrop, with a small dog by her side. The impeccable detailing and refined palette highlight Goya's masterful technique and his ability to immortalize the nobility's sophistication and poise.

202. Martín Zapater

Martín Zapater
  • Artwork Name: Martín Zapater
  • Year: 1797
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 83 x 65 cm

The artwork, titled "Martín Zapater," is an oil on canvas portrait created by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya in the year 1797. Exemplifying the Romanticism movement, this piece measures 83 x 65 cm and is currently housed within the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum in Bilbao, Spain. The composition presents an intimate and detailed portrayal of Martín Zapater, highlighting Goya's exceptional ability to capture the essence and individuality of his subject through masterful rendering and thoughtful character exposition.

203. Maunel Silvela

Maunel Silvela
  • Artwork Name: Maunel Silvela
  • Year: c.1809 - c.1812
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 95 x 68 cm

The artwork, titled "Manuel Silvela," is an oil on canvas portrait created by Francisco Goya between c.1809 and c.1812. Measuring 95 x 68 cm, it exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. The portrait emanates a solemn and contemplative ambiance, achieved through Goya's masterful use of light and shadow, enveloping the subject in a subdued yet intense atmosphere. This notable piece resides in the Museo del Prado, Madrid, Spain.

204. May the rope break

May the rope break
  • Artwork Name: May the rope break
  • Year: 1815 - 1820
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 15.5 x 22 cm

The artwork titled "May the rope break" was created by Francisco Goya between 1815 and 1820. Executed using aquatint and etching on paper, this piece belongs to the Romanticism movement and measures 15.5 by 22 cm. Categorized as a caricature, the artwork depicts a humorous and satirical scene. In it, a figure appears to be balancing precariously on a rope above a crowd, symbolizing tension and the precariousness of human endeavors, a motif common in Goya's later works. The expressive details and the figure's exaggerated expressions evoke a sense of absurdity and critique of societal behaviors.

205. Mob

Mob
  • Artwork Name: Mob
  • Year: 1812 - 1814
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper

The artwork titled "Mob," created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1814, employs aquatint and etching techniques on paper. It is part of the series "The Disasters of War" and belongs to the Romanticism movement, specifically within the caricature genre. The artwork graphically depicts the brutal and chaotic nature of mob violence, a characteristic theme in Goya's oeuvre. Central to the composition are figures engaged in violent actions, capturing the raw and unrestrained emotions of the period. The scene's intensity, conveyed through the stark contrasts and complex line work, powerfully illustrates the horrors and atrocities of war.

206. Naked girl looking in the mirror

Naked girl looking in the mirror

The artwork, "Naked girl looking in the mirror," created by Francisco Goya around 1796-1797, is a wash and ink piece on paper. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is classified within the genre of nude painting (nu). This piece forms part of the "Album of Madrid" series. The artwork portrays a young woman in a naturalistic pose, seated and gazing into a mirror, capturing an intimate moment of self-reflection with delicate and subtle use of wash and ink techniques. The setting is elaborately draped, enhancing the reflective and contemplative mood of the scene.

207. Nanny's boy

Nanny's boy
  • Artwork Name: Nanny's boy
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 20.9 x 15.1 cm

The artwork titled "Nanny's Boy," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 20.9 by 15.1 cm. This piece falls under the Romanticism art movement and is a caricature belonging to the "Los Caprichos" series. It is currently part of a private collection. The artist's use of dark and light contrasts highlights the subject matter with a critical and humorous tone, characteristic of his satirical approach in the series.

208. Stiffened

Stiffened
  • Artwork Name: Stiffened
  • Year: c.1790
  • Medium: etching,paper

The artwork titled "Stiffened" by Francisco Goya, created circa 1790, is an etching on paper that belongs to the Romanticism art movement and portrays the caricature genre. The artwork depicts a somber figure bound to a chair, possibly a commentary on the somber and often brutal realities of the human condition. The intricate etching technique highlights the texture and details, creating a powerful, evocative image that captures the viewer's attention and reflection.

209. Still life of Sheep's Ribs and Head - The Butcher's conter

Still life of Sheep's Ribs and Head - The Butcher's conter

"Still Life of Sheep's Ribs and Head - The Butcher's Counter," created by Francisco Goya during the period of 1810-1812, is an oil painting on canvas, exemplifying the Romanticism movement within still life genre. The dimensions of the artwork are 45 cm by 62 cm. It is housed in the Louvre Museum in Paris, France. The artwork depicts a stark and visceral scene with a sheep's head and ribs positioned on what appears to be a butcher's counter, emphasized by contrasts of dark and light that evoke a somber and contemplative atmosphere.

210. Still life, plucked turkey and pan with fish

Still life, plucked turkey and pan with fish

The artwork, titled "Still life, plucked turkey and pan with fish," was created by Francisco Goya between the years 1808 and 1812. Executed with oil on canvas, this painting is a fine example of Romanticism. Measuring 45 by 62.5 centimeters, it depicts a still life scene featuring a plucked turkey alongside a pan of fish. The use of stark contrasts and a dark background enhances the focus on the subjects, imbuing the scene with a sense of both realism and somberness. Currently, this piece is housed in the Alte Pinakothek museum in Munich, Germany.

211. Still Life Three Salmon Steaks

Still Life Three Salmon Steaks

The artwork "Still Life Three Salmon Steaks" by Francisco Goya, created between 1808 and 1812, is an oil on canvas painting embodying the Romanticism movement. The piece measures 45 by 62 centimeters and is currently housed at the Oskar Reinhart Foundation in Winterthur, Switzerland. Displaying a genre of still life, the artwork vividly captures three meticulously rendered salmon steaks, emphasizing their texture and color against a stark, dark background. The juxtaposition of the rich, red hues of the salmon with the muted, almost shadowy environment exemplifies Goya's mastery in depicting simple subjects with profound realism and subtle dramatic elements.

212. Still life with fruit, bottles, breads

Still life with fruit, bottles, breads

The artwork titled "Still life with fruit, bottles, breads," created by Francisco Goya between 1824 and 1826, is an oil painting on canvas that belongs to the Romanticism movement. The painting, measuring 45 x 62 cm, is classified under the still life genre and is part of the collection at the Oskar Reinhart Foundation in Winterthur, Switzerland. The composition features an array of fruit, including grapes, pears, and figs, along with bottles, a barrel, and several pieces of bread arranged on a table. Goya employs a rich palette and careful attention to texture and light to evoke a sense of abundance and rustic simplicity.

213. Still Life With Golden Beam

Still Life With Golden Beam

The artwork titled "Still Life With Golden Beam" by Francisco Goya, created between 1808 and 1812 in Spain, is an oil painting that belongs to the Romanticism and Realism art movements. Measuring 44.8 x 62.5 cm, it falls under the genres of animal painting and still life. The artwork portrays a clustered arrangement of deceased fish, rendered with meticulous attention to detail, using chiaroscuro to highlight their pallid flesh against a dark background, thereby creating a dramatic and somber atmosphere.

214. Summer, or The Harvest

Summer, or The Harvest

"Summer, or The Harvest," created by Francisco Goya in 1786, is an oil on canvas masterpiece encapsulating the Romanticism art movement. The immense genre painting, measuring 276 by 641 cm, is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts a vibrant and lively harvest scene, teeming with activity and the camaraderie of farmworkers during the summer. The laborers are seen engaging with one another, resting, and working amidst the golden stacks of hay, capturing the essence and spirit of rural life in the 18th century.

215. Swallow it, dog

Swallow it, dog
  • Artwork Name: Swallow it, dog
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.9 x 15.2 cm

The artwork "Swallow it, dog," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is a drypoint etching on paper measuring 21.9 x 15.2 cm. This piece is part of Goya's "Los caprichos" series and is representative of the Romanticism art movement. The genre of the artwork is caricature, and it is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a group of grotesque figures surrounding a kneeling individual in a dark, ominous scene, highlighting Goya's critique of social and political issues through dark humor and satire.

216. Tantalus

Tantalus
  • Artwork Name: Tantalus
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork titled "Tantalus," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper, measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This piece belongs to the Romanticism art movement, specifically categorized under the genre of caricature, and is part of the "Los caprichos" series. The artwork, currently held in a private collection, depicts a dramatic and evocative scene that aligns with Goya's renowned ability to portray the complexities of human emotion and folly.

217. The Adoration of the Name of The Lord

The Adoration of the Name of The Lord

"The Adoration of the Name of The Lord," crafted by Francisco Goya in 1772, is a fresco measuring 700 by 1500 centimeters and embodying the Romanticism art movement. This religious painting exudes a divine reverence, depicting a celestial scene filled with angelic figures and clouds illuminated by a central source of light. The composition is dynamic, with figures in varying postures and expressions, all directing their adoration towards a luminous triangle symbolizing the divine presence. The artwork is notable for its dramatic use of light and shadow, enhancing the ethereal and sacrosanct atmosphere that characterizes Goya's early religious works.

218. Three Men Digging

Three Men Digging
  • Artwork Name: Three Men Digging
  • Year: 1819
  • Medium: wash,paper
  • Dimensions: 20.6 x 14.3 cm

The artwork, titled "Three Men Digging," was created by Francisco Goya in 1819 and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. Executed in wash on paper, this genre painting measures 20.6 by 14.3 centimeters. The artwork depicts three men engrossed in the laborious act of digging, captured with dynamic brushwork that emphasizes the physical effort and intensity of manual labor. The figures are rendered with a sense of realism and movement, characteristic of Goya's ability to convey human emotion and experience.

219. Till death

Till death
  • Artwork Name: Till death
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 22 x 15.4 cm

The artwork "Till death" (1799) by Francisco Goya, an etching on paper measuring 22 x 15.4 cm, belongs to the Romanticism movement and is a part of the "Los caprichos" series. Currently held in a private collection, this caricature exemplifies Goya's satirical style. The artwork depicts a seated elderly woman in a vain attempt to beautify herself with a headpiece while a group of people watches her efforts with amusement. The expression and composition highlight the themes of vanity and the societal perceptions of aging, rendered in Goya's characteristic dark and expressive style.

220. Time of the Old Women

Time of the Old Women

"Time of the Old Women," created by Francisco Goya in 1820, is an oil painting on canvas that belongs to the Romanticism art movement. This genre painting, measuring 181 by 125 centimeters, is currently housed in the Palais des Beaux-Arts de Lille in Lille, France. The artwork portrays a haunting scene with three elderly women, two seated in elaborate garments with grotesque expressions, while a skeletal figure looms behind them with a broom, symbolizing the passage of time and the inevitable approach of death. The dark, eerie atmosphere exemplifies Goya's profound exploration of human condition, aging, and mortality.

221. Tio Paquete

Tio Paquete
  • Artwork Name: Tio Paquete
  • Year: c.1820
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 39.1 x 31.1 cm

The artwork, titled "Tio Paquete," is an oil painting on canvas created circa 1820 by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya. Measuring 39.1 x 31.1 cm, this portrait belongs to the Romanticism movement and is presently housed in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, Spain. The painting portrays a man with a weathered face, capturing a blend of realism and expressiveness typical of Goya's later works, and is characterized by a dramatic use of light and shadow that emphasizes the figure's intense, somewhat eerie expression.

222. Tobias and the Angel

Tobias and the Angel

The artwork, titled "Tobias and the Angel," was created by Francisco Goya and belongs to the art movements of Romanticism and Rococo. This religious painting depicts the biblical story of Tobias and the Angel, showcasing an interaction between the two central figures. Tobias, attired in a red and white garment and holding a fish, gazes upward toward the angel, who is draped in ethereal white robes with radiant wings and a halo-like glow. The painting masterfully combines divine light and detailed human expressions, reflecting Goya's skill and the thematic depth characteristic of his era.

223. To the Count Palatine

To the Count Palatine
  • Artwork Name: To the Count Palatine
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,drypoint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.7 x 15.2 cm

The artwork titled "To the Count Palatine," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is a caricature belonging to the Romanticism movement and is part of the "Los Caprichos" series. Executed through aquatint, drypoint, and etching on paper, the piece measures 21.7 x 15.2 cm and is held in a private collection. The artwork portrays a central figure, presumably the Count Palatine, smiling confidently while interacting with two bowed figures in the foreground. The scene is rich in detail, featuring elaborate clothing and a background suggestively adorned with various objects, characteristic of Goya's satirical approach to social critique.

224. Trials

Trials
  • Artwork Name: Trials
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21 x 15 cm

"Trials" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is a distinguished piece within the Romanticism art movement. Rendered using aquatint and etching on paper, this caricature belongs to the "Los Caprichos" series. Measuring 21 x 15 cm, the artwork resides in a private collection. It portrays a harrowing scene featuring a solemn goat figure and two human forms in an intense, probable act of exorcism or ritualistic action, contributing to its dark, satirical commentary on human society and moral issues of that era. The detailed etching technique amplifies the grotesque and haunting atmosphere, hallmarking Goya's critical and imaginative approach to art.

225. Triple generation

Triple generation

"Triple Generation" is a genre painting by Francisco Goya, created between 1760 and 1769, during the Romanticism art movement. The artwork measures 79 by 55 centimeters. The composition of the artwork portrays a religious, multi-generational scene imbued with symbolic and emotive elements. In the lower part, there is a depiction of older figures, along with a central female figure holding an infant, highlighting the theme of family and generational continuity. Above them, celestial figures and ethereal beings, including an elderly bearded figure surrounded by clouds, add a divine and heavenly aspect to the artwork, evoking a sense of spiritual reverence and interconnectedness across generations. The overall atmosphere is one of piety and divine blessing, underscoring the Romantic emphasis on intense emotion and individual experience.

226. Truth Has Died

Truth Has Died
  • Artwork Name: Truth Has Died
  • Year: 1810 - 1814
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 17.5 x 22 cm

"Truth Has Died," created by Francisco Goya between 1810 and 1814, is an etching on paper associated with the Romanticism movement. With dimensions of 17.5 by 22 cm, the artwork functions as a caricature. The artwork depicts a dismal scene with shadowy, contorted figures symbolizing the death of truth, surrounding a central, lifeless female form. The expressions and postures of the surrounding individuals suggest a sense of despair, complicity, and mourning, conveying a powerful critique of societal and political conditions of the time.

227. Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History

Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History

The artwork titled "Truth Rescued by Time, Witnessed by History," created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1814, is an oil painting on canvas from the Romanticism art movement. This allegorical painting, measuring 294 x 244 cm, is housed at the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, Sweden. The artwork depicts an allegorical scene where the personified figure of Time, identifiable by his wings and hourglass, rescues Truth, represented by a young woman holding a mirror, while History, another female figure, records the event. The composition captures the Romantic era's fascination with expressing profound and complex themes through symbolic representation.

228. Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga

Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga

"Cardinal Luis Maria de Borbon y Vallabriga" is an oil painting on canvas created between 1798 and 1800 by the eminent Spanish artist Francisco Goya. As a quintessential example of Romanticism, this portrait, measuring 200 by 106 cm, is housed in the Museo de Arte de São Paulo (MASP) in São Paulo, Brazil. The artwork features a full-bodied depiction of a cardinal dressed in elaborate ecclesiastical garments, holding an open book, and is characterized by its meticulous attention to detail and solemn expression, capturing both the regality and the introspective nature of its subject.

229. Carlos IV on Horseback

Carlos IV on Horseback

The artwork, titled "Carlos IV on Horseback," is a portrait by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya. It belongs to the Romanticism and Rococo art movements. The painting vividly depicts King Carlos IV mounted on a distinguished horse, showcasing regal attire and a composed demeanor, set against a serene background. The meticulous detailing and Goya's masterful use of light and shadow imbue the piece with a sense of grandeur and nobility, characteristic of the portrait genre within the said artistic movements.

230. Cartloads to the cemetery

Cartloads to the cemetery

"Cartloads to the Cemetery," created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1815, is a poignant aquatint and etching on paper measuring 20.5 x 15.5 cm. Executed during the Romanticism movement, this artwork belongs to the caricature genre. It starkly depicts the grim reality of death, as individuals are depicted loading lifeless bodies onto a cart destined for the cemetery. The stark black and white contrast enhances the somber mood, reflecting the harsh consequences of war and societal neglect.

231. Cats fighting

Cats fighting

The artwork "Cats Fighting" by Francisco Goya, belongs to the Romanticism and Rococo movements and is a genre of animal painting. The artwork portrays two cats in a tense confrontation atop a brick wall. One cat, black and sleek, hunches low with piercing eyes focused intently on its opponent, while the other cat, a grey tabby, arches its back and opens its mouth in a heated snarl, creating a palpable sense of hostility and impending conflict. The background, painted in subdued tones, offers a stark contrast to the vivid depiction of animal aggression, emphasizing the dramatic and dynamic elements characteristic of Goya’s style.

232. Chained Prisoner

Chained Prisoner
  • Artwork Name: Chained Prisoner
  • Year: 1806 - 1812
  • Medium: wash,ink,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.8 x 15.1 cm

The artwork, titled "Chained Prisoner," created by Francisco Goya between 1806 and 1812, is a poignant example of the Romanticism art movement. Rendered in wash and ink on paper, it measures 21.8 by 15.1 centimeters and is categorized under the genre painting genre. Currently housed in the Musée Bonnat in Bayonne, France, the artwork depicts a shackled prisoner in a desolate, minimalist setting. The chained figure, characterized by his weary, despondent posture and expressive facial features, evokes a profound sense of suffering and human despair, reflecting Goya's mastery in capturing raw, emotional intensity.

233. Charles III

Charles III
  • Artwork Name: Charles III
  • Year: 1786 - 1788
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 210 x 127 cm

The artwork, titled "Charles III," is an oil on canvas portrait created by Francisco Goya between 1786 and 1788. As a prominent piece within the Romanticism art movement, the portrait measures 210 by 127 centimeters and is currently housed at the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The painting features Charles III standing in the foreground, wearing a distinctive tricorn hat and formal attire, and holding a rifle. A serene landscape stretches behind him, featuring rolling hills and a clear sky, while a resting dog lies at his feet, adding a sense of tranquility to the distinguished and composed representation of the monarch.

234. Children inflating a bladder

Children inflating a bladder

"Children Inflating a Bladder" is a genre painting by Francisco Goya, associated with the Romanticism and Rococo art movements. The artwork depicts two children engaged in the playful activity of inflating a bladder, set against a lush, outdoor landscape. The scene is rendered with soft, delicate hues and detailed attention to the children's expressions and attire, reflecting the social and cultural milieu of the time. The background, with figures partially hidden and enveloped by the natural surroundings, enhances the whimsical and innocent atmosphere of the composition.

235. Christ on the Mount of Olives

Christ on the Mount of Olives

The artwork, titled "Christ on the Mount of Olives," was created in 1819 by Francisco Goya, a prominent artist associated with the Romanticism movement. This religious painting, rendered in oil on panel, measures 47 by 35 centimeters and is currently housed in Escuelas Pías de San Antón in Madrid, Spain. It depicts a poignant scene featuring Jesus Christ in a moment of deep prayer and despair on the Mount of Olives, accompanied by an angel offering divine comfort, emphasizing Goya's dramatic use of light and shadow to convey spiritual and emotional depth.

236. Circumcision

Circumcision

The artwork, titled "Circumcision," was created by Francisco Goya in 1774. This religious painting belongs to the Romanticism art movement. It depicts a religious ceremony, showcasing a group of figures gathered closely around an infant lying on a draped surface, highlighting a solemn moment of circumcision. The composition features a balance of warm and cool tones, with figures dressed in classical robes, and the use of light and shadow enhances the emotional depth of the scene.

237. Colossus

Colossus
  • Artwork Name: Colossus
  • Year: c.1815
  • Dimensions: 28.5 x 21 cm

The artwork "Colossus," created by Francisco Goya around 1815, is a notable example of Romanticism. This mythological painting, measuring 28.5 x 21 cm, portrays a massive, brooding figure overlooking a landscape under a crescent moon, evoking a sense of awe and foreboding typical of the Romantic era. Currently housed in the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris, this piece captivates with its dramatic and imposing representation, highlighting the era's characteristic fascination with the sublime and the power of nature.

238. Neither more nor less

Neither more nor less

The artwork titled "Neither more nor less," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is a drypoint and etching on paper belonging to the Romanticism movement. Measuring 21.9 x 15.2 cm, this caricature is part of the series "Los caprichos" and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a seemingly satirical scene featuring an animal, resembling a donkey, being painted in a portrait by a primate, likely serving as a commentary on human nature and societal norms during Goya's time.

239. Night Scene from the Inquisition

Night Scene from the Inquisition

The artwork titled "Night Scene from the Inquisition" by Francisco Goya, created within the Romanticism and Rococo movements, serves as a powerful genre and history painting. The scene is imbued with dark, somber hues and dramatic lighting, depicting a gathering of figures enshrouded in shadows, likely engaged in a nightmarish, inquisitorial tribunal. The use of light and shadow adds to the intense atmosphere, giving the viewer a sense of the harrowing events taking place. The artist's attention to detail and emotive portrayal underscores the historical and cultural significance of the depicted moment.

240. Nobody knows anybody

Nobody knows anybody

"Nobody knows anybody," an etching on paper from the year 1799, is an emblematic piece from Francisco Goya's celebrated series, "Los Caprichos." Distinguished by its dimensions of 21.9 x 15.3 cm, the artwork is a caricature embodying the Romanticism art movement. It features a compelling scene marked by its intricate play of shadows and figures, evoking a sense of mystery and anonymity among the characters. With its insightful social commentary, this piece currently resides in a private collection, perpetuating Goya's enduring critique of human nature and societal norms.

241. No one has seen us

No one has seen us

The artwork titled "No one has seen us" is an etching on paper by the artist Francisco Goya, created in 1799. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is a part of the "Los Caprichos" series. This caricature measures 21.7 x 15.2 cm and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork depicts a scene with four figures engaging in a clandestine activity, characterized by exaggerated expressions and dramatic use of light and shadow, which is quintessential of Goya's critical and satirical style.

242. Not For Those

Not For Those
  • Artwork Name: Not For Those
  • Year: 1812 - 1814
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper

The artwork, titled "Not For Those," was created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1814. Utilizing the mediums of aquatint, etching, and paper, this piece falls under the Romanticism art movement and is part of the series "The Disasters of War." The genre is caricature, and the scene depicted is intensely expressive, showing the harrowing aftermath of conflict. Figures are dramatically arranged, emphasizing the brutality and despair inflicted by war, with the striking use of contrast and shadow to highlight the suffering and turmoil of the individuals portrayed.

243. Nothing. The event will tell

Nothing. The event will tell

The artwork titled "Nothing. The event will tell" is an aquatint and etching on paper created by Francisco Goya between 1815 and 1820. It measures 15.5 by 20 centimeters and is recognized within the Romanticism art movement. As a caricature, the artwork vividly depicts a grotesque and dark scene, featuring a gaunt, skeletal figure lying in the foreground holding a paper, while ominous, spectral faces and figures crowd the background, rendering a surreal and haunting atmosphere.

244. Now they are sitting well

Now they are sitting well

"Now they are sitting well" is a notable artwork by Francisco Goya, created in 1799 as part of his "Los caprichos" series. This piece, rendered using aquatint and etching techniques on paper, epitomizes the Romanticism movement and falls within the caricature genre. Measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm, the artwork portrays a group of figures in a somewhat fantastical and satirical scene, highlighting Goya's critique of societal follies and absurdities with a dark yet humorous undertone.

245. Old Beggar with a Maja

Old Beggar with a Maja

The artwork, titled "Old Beggar with a Maja," was created by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya during the years 1797 to 1799. It is a genre painting, exemplary of the Romanticism art movement. The scene depicted showcases an interaction between an old beggar and a maja, a term referring to a woman of the lower classes in Spanish culture, often noted for their vibrant attire and bold demeanor. The artwork captures a moment of social exchange, highlighting the contrasts and underlying tensions within the societal strata of that period. Through meticulous detailing and evocative composition, Goya presents a compelling portrayal of everyday life imbued with both realism and emotional depth.

246. Two Old Ones Eating Soup / The Witchy Brew

Two Old Ones Eating Soup / The Witchy Brew

The artwork "Two Old Ones Eating Soup / The Witchy Brew," created by Francisco Goya between 1819 and 1823, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 83.4 x 49.3 cm. It belongs to the series known as the "Black Paintings" and is an exemplar of the Romanticism movement. This genre painting is housed at the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts two elderly figures, shrouded in darkness, seemingly engaged in the act of consuming a meal. The use of sombre tones and expressive, almost grotesque features conveys a sense of foreboding and introspection, characteristic of Goya's later works.

247. Old swinging

Old swinging

"Old Swinging," a genre painting from the Romanticism movement, was created around 1820 by the renowned artist Francisco Goya. The artwork depicts an elderly figure in a moment of joviality and freedom, swinging with evident delight. The somber, monochromatic palette underscores the juxtaposition of old age and childlike joy, a testament to Goya's ability to capture the complexities of human emotion.

248. The Annunciation

The Annunciation
  • Artwork Name: The Annunciation
  • Year: c.1785
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 42 x 26 cm

"The Annunciation" by Francisco Goya, circa 1785, is a religious painting executed in oil on canvas, indicative of the Romanticism art movement. Measuring 42 x 26 cm, this artwork resides in a private collection. It portrays the biblical scene of the Annunciation, showcasing an angel, presumably Gabriel, imparting divine news to the Virgin Mary, who is depicted in a posture of humility and reflection. Above them, a divine presence and cherubic figures are illustrated amidst cascading light, symbolizing the Holy Spirit's descent and the celestial approval of the annunciation event.

249. The Annunciation

The Annunciation
  • Artwork Name: The Annunciation
  • Year: 1785
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 280 x 177 cm

"The Annunciation," an exquisite oil on canvas work by esteemed artist Francisco Goya, was created in 1785 and is a distinguished piece within the Romanticism movement. Measuring 280 x 177 cm, the artwork depicts a religious scene and is currently held in a private collection. The artwork captures the sacred moment of the Annunciation, with an angelic figure delivering a divine message to a devout recipient. The ethereal light and meticulous detail exemplify Goya's masterful handling of this profound biblical narrative.

250. The Arrest of Christ

The Arrest of Christ

"The Arrest of Christ," painted by Francisco Goya in 1788, is an oil on canvas religious artwork measuring 40 x 23 cm. Created during the Romanticism movement, the painting depicts the solemn moment of Christ's apprehension, surrounded by a dark and emotional atmosphere. Housed at the Toledo Cathedral in Toledo, Spain, the artwork captures a dramatic and poignant scene, emphasizing human expressions and the interplay of light and shadow typical of Goya's style. The somber faces and dynamic poses of the figures, shrouded in an eerie darkness, intensify the emotional weight of the biblical event.

251. The Arrest of Christ

The Arrest of Christ

"The Arrest of Christ," created by Francisco Goya in 1798, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 40 by 23 centimeters, falling within the Romanticism art movement. This piece, a religious painting depicting the moment of Christ's arrest, eloquently utilizes dramatic contrasts of light and shadow to emphasize the central figure of Christ, surrounded by the ambiguous forms of his captors. The intense emotional and spiritual gravity of the scene is masterfully captured with vigorous brush strokes and a somber palette. The artwork is currently housed at the Toledo Cathedral in Toledo, Spain.

252. The Bewitched Man

The Bewitched Man

"The Bewitched Man," an allegorical painting by Francisco Goya created circa 1798 in Spain, exemplifies the Romanticism art movement. The artwork portrays a scene steeped in surreal and supernatural elements, featuring a man seemingly entangled in a dark, mystical encounter. Ethereal figures, possibly symbolizing demonic or spectral presences, loom in the background, adding to the enigmatic and foreboding atmosphere. The central figure's expression of fear, combined with the shadowy and dramatic use of light and color, powerfully conveys the theme of bewitchment and supernatural dread prevalent in Goya's allegorical works.

253. The Bookseller's Wife

The Bookseller's Wife

"The Bookseller's Wife," created by Francisco Goya between approximately 1805 and 1808, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is a portrait. The artwork is displayed at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, USA. It depicts a poised and elegantly dressed woman, adorned in a dark gown with a delicate lace shawl draped over her shoulders and head. The woman's serene and composed expression, along with the intricate detail of her attire, exemplifies Goya's masterful use of texture and light, characteristic of his portraiture work during this period.

254. The Bravery of Martincho in the Ring of Saragassa

The Bravery of Martincho in the Ring of Saragassa

"The Bravery of Martincho in the Ring of Saragassa," created by Francisco Goya between 1815 and 1816, is an artwork executed using aquatint and etching on paper. Measuring 24.5 x 35.5 cm, the artwork belongs to the Romanticism movement and forms part of Goya's "Tauromaquia" series. Characterized as a caricature, the artwork depicts a dramatic bullfighting scene, showcasing the matador Martincho's daring confrontation with a bull, while an audience watches attentively from the stands, emphasizing the tension and valor inherent in the spectacle.

255. The Burial of Christ

The Burial of Christ

"The Burial of Christ" is an oil-on-canvas religious painting executed by Francisco Goya between 1770 and 1772. Falling within the Romanticism art movement, the artwork measures 130 by 95 centimeters and depicts a somber scene of Christ's burial. The composition features a group of mourners surrounding the lifeless body of Christ, with expressions of grief and reverence illuminated by dramatic chiaroscuro. The use of dark tones and the intricate detailing of the figures convey a profound emotional depth, characteristic of Goya's early works in religious painting.

256. The Burial of the Sardine (Corpus Christi Festival on Ash Wednesday)

The Burial of the Sardine (Corpus Christi Festival on Ash Wednesday)

Entitled "The Burial of the Sardine (Corpus Christi Festival on Ash Wednesday)" and executed by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1814, the artwork is a vibrant oil painting on canvas measuring 60 by 82 centimeters, reflecting the Romanticism art movement. As a genre painting, it vividly captures the boisterous and festive scene of a public celebration, likely filled with jesters and revelers partaking in traditional festivity activities, against a background of expressive figures and dynamic compositions. The artwork is currently housed at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain, and illustrates Goya's masterful ability to convey the lively, sometimes chaotic spirit of communal traditions through his unique artistic vision.

257. The Captivity is as Barbarous as the Crime

The Captivity is as Barbarous as the Crime

"The Captivity is as Barbarous as the Crime" is an etching on paper by Francisco Goya, created circa 1815 during the Romanticism art movement. The artwork measures 11 x 8.5 cm and exemplifies the caricature genre, portraying a profound commentary on the theme of captivity. The piece depicts a chained and constricted figure, effectively evoking a sense of brutality and inhumanity, highlighting Goya's critical perspective on the barbarous nature of imprisonment. The dynamic contrasts in shading and stark outlines intensify the emotional impact, rendering the artwork a striking visual critique of societal injustices.

258. Tubercio Pérez Cuervo

Tubercio Pérez Cuervo

The artwork, titled "Tubercio Pérez Cuervo," is an oil painting on canvas created by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya in 1820. As a quintessential representation of the Romanticism movement, this portrait, measuring 102 x 81 cm, epitomizes Goya’s mastery in capturing the essence and character of his subjects. The artwork features a poised and contemplative figure, rendered with meticulous attention to light and shadow, highlighting intricate details in the textures of the subject's attire and expressions, thus invoking a profound sense of depth and presence.

259. Twerp

Twerp
  • Artwork Name: Twerp
  • Year: 1816 - 1823
  • Medium: etching,paper

Created by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya between 1816 and 1823, the artwork titled "Twerp" is an etching on paper, exemplifying the Romanticism movement. It is a caricature part of Goya's "Disparate" series. The artwork portrays a grotesque and exaggerated figure in a menacing stance, with distorted faces emerging from the darkness, evoking a sense of surrealism and dark satire. The use of shadow and light further accentuates the dramatic and eerie atmosphere, characteristic of Goya's critical and often haunting style.

260. Two Dancing Old Friends

Two Dancing Old Friends

The artwork, titled "Two Dancing Old Friends," was created by Francisco Goya in 1828 and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. As part of the Romanticism movement, this piece falls under the genre of caricature. The artwork depicts two elderly figures engaged in a lively dance, characterized by exaggerated expressions and playful postures, embodying Goya's deft ability to blend humor with a poignant reflection on the passage of time.

261. Two Old Men / Two Monks / An Old Man and a Monk

Two Old Men / Two Monks / An Old Man and a Monk

The artwork titled "Two Old Men / Two Monks / An Old Man and a Monk," created by Francisco Goya between 1821 and 1823, is an oil painting on plaster and canvas. It is a part of the "Black Paintings" series, which Goya painted during the latter part of his career, characterized by dark and haunting themes. Notably influenced by the Romanticism movement, this portrait is measured at 146 by 66 centimeters and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The painting depicts two elderly figures, their somber presence and subdued color palette evoking a profound sense of introspection and melancholy, characteristic of Goya's late works.

262. Unfortunate Events in the Front Seats of the Ring of Madrid

Unfortunate Events in the Front Seats of the Ring of Madrid

"Unfortunate Events in the Front Seats of the Ring of Madrid," created by Francisco Goya between 1815 and 1816, is an aquatint etching on paper measuring 24.5 x 35.5 centimeters. This artwork, belonging to the Romanticism movement and categorized as a caricature, is part of Goya's "Tauromaquia" series. The artwork depicts a chaotic scene in a bullring, capturing a vivid moment of disorder and struggle, emphasizing the unpredictability and violence associated with bullfighting. The piece embodies Goya's characteristic scrutiny of human folly and societal customs through a dramatic and evocative medium.

263. Vagabonds Resting in a Cave

Vagabonds Resting in a Cave

"Vagabonds Resting in a Cave" is an evocative genre painting by Francisco Goya, executed between 1798 and 1800. The artwork, rendered in oil on canvas, measures 33 x 57 cm and is part of the Romanticism movement. Presently held in a private collection, the painting depicts a group of individuals gathered within the dim confines of a cave, partially illuminated by a stark beam of light. The use of chiaroscuro creates a somber, introspective atmosphere, characteristic of Goya's mastery in conveying deep emotions and human experiences.

264. Village Procession

Village Procession
  • Artwork Name: Village Procession
  • Year: 1786 - 1787
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 169 x 137 cm

"Village Procession," created by Francisco Goya between 1786 and 1787, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 169 x 137 cm. As a notable example of Romanticism and genre painting, the artwork depicts a religious procession with townspeople, set against the backdrop of an expansive sky and a rugged landscape. The artwork, which is part of a private collection, captures the communal and spiritual reverence of village life, highlighting Goya's adeptness in portraying human activity within natural settings.

265. Wait till you have been anointed

Wait till you have been anointed

"Wait till you have been anointed," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an artwork from the Romanticism movement, executed through the mediums of drypoint and etching on paper. This piece, measuring 15.3 by 21.8 centimeters, falls under the genre of caricature and is part of the series "Los caprichos." Presently held in a private collection, the artwork depicts a fantastical scene featuring grotesque and mythical figures engaged in a peculiar ritualistic act. The composition's stark contrasts and surreal elements are characteristic of Goya's satirical and critical approach, aiming to comment on societal follies and human vices.

266. War scene

War scene
  • Artwork Name: War scene
  • Year: 1810 - 1812
  • Medium: brush,wash,paper
  • Dimensions: 15 x 19.5 cm

The artwork titled "War Scene," created by Francisco Goya between 1810 and 1812, epitomizes the Romanticism art movement. Executed with brush and wash on paper, this genre painting measures 15 by 19.5 centimeters and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork depicts a chaotic and intense scene of conflict, with dynamic and dark tones dominating the composition. Figures struggle and intertwine in a turbulent melee, evoking the harrowing and brutal nature of war.

267. Water Carrier

Water Carrier
  • Artwork Name: Water Carrier
  • Year: 1808 - 1812
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 68 x 52 cm

"Water Carrier," created by Francisco Goya between 1808 and 1812, is an oil painting on canvas, measuring 68 by 52 centimeters. This piece, rooted in the Romanticism movement, exemplifies the genre painting style. The artwork depicts a woman carrying a large, earthenware water jug and a small basket, embodying a scene of everyday life with a dramatic, yet earthy and rustic quality typical of the Romantic era. The muted and dark background contrasts sharply with the illuminated figure, emphasizing her presence and the weight of her task, while capturing a moment of quiet resilience and dignity.

268. Duchess of Alba, The White Duchess

Duchess of Alba, The White Duchess

The artwork, titled "Duchess of Alba, The White Duchess," is an oil on canvas painting by Francisco Goya, created in 1795. Measuring 192 by 128 centimeters, this portrait belongs to the Romanticism art movement. The artwork portrays a dignified woman standing elegantly, dressed in a white gown accentuated with red accessories, including a sash, bow, and necklace, complemented by a red flower in her hair. A delicate, small white dog stands near her feet, adding a touch of intimacy to the grandiose depiction. Goya's portrait captures the grace and poise of the subject, seamlessly merging refined detail with the emotive expressiveness characteristic of Romanticism.

269. Duke of Alba

Duke of Alba
  • Artwork Name: Duke of Alba
  • Year: 1795
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 195 x 126 cm

The artwork, titled "Duke of Alba," was created in 1795 by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya. Rendered in oil on canvas, it is a portrait that measures 195 by 126 centimeters and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. The Duke of Alba is depicted with a meticulous attention to detail and is shown in a thoughtful pose, leaning on a piece of furniture, perhaps a dignified desk, while holding and seemingly perusing a document. The painting captures a sense of nobility and introspection. This significant piece is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, highlighting its historical and cultural value.

270. Duke of San Carlos

Duke of San Carlos

The artwork, titled "Duke of San Carlos," is an oil-on-canvas portrait created by Francisco Goya in 1815. Rendered in the Romanticism art movement, the painting measures 237 by 153 centimeters and depicts a distinguished man adorned in luxurious attire, exuding an air of nobility and authority. The subject is elegantly posed, with a refined, confident stance, holding a hat and cane. The painting is currently housed in the Museo de Zaragoza in Zaragoza, Spain, and exemplifies Goya's masterful ability to capture the essence of his subjects through his expert use of color and detail.

271. El Lazarillo de Tormes

El Lazarillo de Tormes

"El Lazarillo de Tormes," crafted in 1819 by Francisco Goya, is an evocative oil painting on canvas that measures 80 x 65 cm. Aligning with the Romanticism movement, this portrait is currently housed in a private collection. The artwork deftly captures a tender and intimate scene, drawing the viewer's attention to the emotional connection between the two characters, highlighted by Goya's masterful use of light and shadow as well as his meticulous attention to detail.

272. Equestrian portrait of Maria Luisa of Parma

Equestrian portrait of Maria Luisa of Parma

The artwork, titled "Equestrian Portrait of Maria Luisa of Parma," was masterfully created by Francisco Goya in 1788. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and exemplifies the genre of portraiture. Measuring 338 by 282 centimeters, the artwork depicts Maria Luisa of Parma, regally mounted on a noble steed. The artist captures a sense of dignity and grandeur, with the subject adorned in opulent attire, demonstrating both her status and the rich aesthetic sensibilities of the time. The background features a serene landscape that enhances the majesty of the central figure.

273. Even so he cannot make her out

Even so he cannot make her out

The artwork titled "Even so he cannot make her out," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is part of the "Los Caprichos" series and exemplifies the Romanticism movement. Rendered using aquatint, etching, and paper, the piece measures 21.5 x 15.5 cm and belongs to the caricature genre. The artwork depicts a nuanced scene portraying a man and a woman in an ambiguous interaction, watched by another seated woman in the background, all contributing to an atmosphere of satirical social commentary typical of Goya's sophisticated and critical approach to human folly and vice.

274. Farewell

Farewell
  • Artwork Name: Farewell
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

"Farewell," created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper, measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This artwork, representative of the Romanticism movement, is classified as a caricature and is part of the "Los caprichos" series. The composition depicts a dark, atmospheric scene marked by expressive and haunting figures that evoke a sense of melancholy and departure, underscored by Goya's masterful use of light and shadow to create a dramatic and poignant visual narrative.

275. Feminine Folly

Feminine Folly
  • Artwork Name: Feminine Folly
  • Year: c.1819 - c.1824
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 24 x 35 cm

"Feminine Folly", created by Francisco Goya circa 1819 to 1824, exemplifies the Romanticism art movement through its evocative and intricate depiction. The artwork, part of the "Disparate" series and a caricature genre, features a scene executed in aquatint and etching on paper, measuring 24 by 35 cm. The artwork portrays several women holding a blanket and tossing a figure into the air, encapsulated in a stark, high-contrast composition that conveys a sense of dynamic movement and social commentary in Goya's quintessentially satirical style.

276. Portrait of Javier Goya, the Artist's Son

Portrait of Javier Goya, the Artist's Son

"Portrait of Javier Goya, the Artist's Son," created by Francisco Goya in 1824, is a chalk drawing on paper that resides in a private collection. This small yet striking portrait measures 9 x 8 cm and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. The artwork features the artist's son, Javier Goya, depicted with meticulous attention to detail, capturing a somber expression that highlights Francisco Goya's mastery in portraiture. The use of chalk and the intimate dimensions of the piece create a delicate and personal portrayal that exemplifies the artist's skill in conveying depth and emotion.

277. Portrait of José Antonio, Marqués de Caballero

Portrait of José Antonio, Marqués de Caballero

The artwork, titled "Portrait of José Antonio, Marqués de Caballero," was crafted by Francisco Goya in 1807. This oil on canvas piece, measuring 105.5 x 84 cm, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and falls within the genre of portraiture. The artwork depicts a distinguished gentleman, clad in opulent attire adorned with medals and insignia, seated against a dark background that accentuates his dignified presence. The meticulous detailing of his elaborate garments and the refined expression on his face exemplify Goya's mastery in capturing both the physical and psychological nuances of his subject.

278. Portrait of Leandro Fernandez de Moratin

Portrait of Leandro Fernandez de Moratin

The artwork, titled "Portrait of Leandro Fernandez de Moratin," is an oil painting on canvas created by the renowned artist Francisco Goya in 1799. Measuring 56 x 73 cm, this portrait exemplifies the Romanticism movement. The painting is held at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. In the portrait, Goya captures the subject, Leandro Fernandez de Moratin, with striking realism and depth, emphasizing his contemplative gaze and refined attire, set against a dark, subdued background that accentuates the subject's visage and expression.

279. Portrait of Mariano Goya

Portrait of Mariano Goya

The artwork "Portrait of Mariano Goya," created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1814, is an oil painting on a panel measuring 59 x 47 cm. This piece, which belongs to the Romanticism art movement, falls under the genre of portraiture and is currently housed in a private collection. The artwork depicts a young boy, seated and dressed in a dark outfit with a white lace collar, holding a sheet of paper with musical annotations. His attire includes a tall black hat, and the overall somber color palette and detailed rendering exemplify Goya's masterful technique and emotional depth.

280. Portrait of Maria Teresa de Vallabriga on horseback

Portrait of Maria Teresa de Vallabriga on horseback

The artwork is titled "Portrait of Maria Teresa de Vallabriga on horseback," created by the eminent artist Francisco Goya in 1783. It is an oil painting on canvas, measuring 82.5 by 61.7 cm and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. The portrait genre artwork features intricate details and a harmonious composition, depicting Maria Teresa de Vallabriga astride a horse against a backdrop of mountainous terrain. The artwork is currently housed in the prestigious Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy.

281. Portrait of Maria Teresa of Ballabriga, Countess of Chinchon

Portrait of Maria Teresa of Ballabriga, Countess of Chinchon

The artwork, titled "Portrait of Maria Teresa of Ballabriga, Countess of Chinchon," is a distinguished oil on canvas painting created by Francisco Goya in the year 1800. Exemplifying the Romanticism movement, this portrait measures 216 by 144 cm and currently resides in a private collection. The piece depicts a seated woman, elegantly dressed in a cream-colored gown adorned with a lace hem. She is positioned against a dark, indistinct background, which highlights her serene demeanor and refined posture. The soft, delicate brushwork, combined with the subtleties in her facial expression and attire, evoke a sense of grace and nobility, characteristic of Goya's romantic portraiture.

282. Portrait of Pedro Mocarte, a Singer of the Cathedral of Toledo

Portrait of Pedro Mocarte, a Singer of the Cathedral of Toledo

The artwork, titled "Portrait of Pedro Mocarte, a Singer of the Cathedral of Toledo," was created by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya in 1806. This portrait, belonging to the Romanticism art movement, depicts Pedro Mocarte adorned in attire befitting his distinguished status. Goya masterfully captures the essence and likeness of his subject, rendering a realistic and respectful portrayal that exemplifies the grandeur and humanism characteristic of Romanticism. The painter's expert use of light and shadow imbues the portrait with depth and emotional resonance, effectively immortalizing the solemnity and dignity of Mocarte's persona.

283. Portrait of Senora Berm sezne Kepmesa

Portrait of Senora Berm sezne Kepmesa

The artwork under consideration is titled "Portrait of Senora Berm sezne Kepmesa," created by the renowned artist Francisco Goya in the year 1795. This piece, a portrait, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is currently housed in the Budapest Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest, Hungary. The portrait features a woman seated with an open book resting on her lap, adorned in an elegant, elaborate dress with intricate details. Her attire includes a voluminous hat, further accentuating the sophisticated and graceful demeanor captured by Goya's masterful brushwork and rich use of colors.

284. Portrait of the Actor Isidro Meiquez

Portrait of the Actor Isidro Meiquez

The artwork, titled "Portrait of the Actor Isidro Meiquez," was painted by Francisco Goya in 1807, during the Romanticism movement. This portrait genre painting depicts its subject with a formal and expressive demeanor, capturing the essence of the individual's character and status. The use of shadows and the soft blending of colors in the background emphasize the central figure, providing a sense of depth and adding to the emotional intensity characteristic of Romanticism. Goya's meticulous attention to detail and the subject's poised yet contemplative expression convey a profound connection between the artist and the actor portrayed.

285. Portrait of the Artist Julio Asensio

Portrait of the Artist Julio Asensio

The artwork, titled "Portrait of the Artist Julio Asensio," was created around 1798 by Francisco Goya, a prominent figure in the Romanticism art movement. It is a portrait genre painting currently housed in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Museum in Madrid, Spain. The portrait depicts Julio Asensio, positioned in a dimly lit space with an ambiance filled with mystery and introspection, characteristic of Goya’s romantic style. The use of shadows and light accentuates the artist's intense expression and the serene yet contemplative mood of the piece.

286. The Hawthorn Seller

The Hawthorn Seller

"The Hawthorn Seller" by Francisco Goya, belonging to the Rococo and Romanticism art movements, is a genre painting that vividly captures a scene from everyday life. The artwork depicts a group of individuals in a bustling outdoor market, with a young woman prominently featured in the foreground, carrying a tray of hawthorns. The backdrop includes a blend of architectural and natural elements, skillfully rendered to create an ambiance of lively street commerce. The artist's keen attention to detail and composition enhances the narrative quality of the scene, illustrating the everyday interactions and cultural contexts of the period.

287. The Holy Family

The Holy Family
  • Artwork Name: The Holy Family
  • Year: c.1780
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 200 x 148 cm

"The Holy Family" is an oil painting on canvas, created circa 1780 by the renowned artist Francisco Goya. Measuring 200 by 148 centimeters, this religious painting is a quintessential example of the Romanticism art movement. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, the artwork depicts a serene, intimate family scene characterized by its tender portrayal of parental and divine affection. The use of light and shadow accentuates the warmth and sanctity surrounding the figures, highlighting Goya's masterful ability to evoke deep emotion and spirituality through his work.

288. The ill matched Couple

The ill matched Couple

"The ill Matched Couple" is an oil painting on tin created by Francisco Goya in 1828, epitomizing the Romanticism art movement through its genre painting style. The artwork depicts a poignant scene of a marriage ceremony, wherein the couple appears to be mismatched, hinting at underlying societal issues or personal conflicts. Goya's masterful brushwork, use of light and shadow, and the intimate yet somber atmosphere imbue the artwork with emotional depth and a contemplative quality, revealing the complexity of human relationships and social conventions of the time.

289. The Injured Mason

The Injured Mason
  • Artwork Name: The Injured Mason
  • Year: 1786 - 1787
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 268 x 110 cm

"The Injured Mason," created by Francisco Goya between 1786 and 1787, is an oil on canvas work emblematic of the Romanticism movement. The genre painting, measuring 268 x 110 cm, depicts two men assisting a wounded mason against the backdrop of a construction site. The artwork, housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, captures the emotional gravity and camaraderie among the workers, rendered with Goya's characteristic attention to human expression and atmospheric detail.

290. The Junta of the Philippines

The Junta of the Philippines

"The Junta of the Philippines," created by Francisco Goya in 1815, is an oil painting on canvas measuring 327 x 447 cm. The artwork epitomizes the Romanticism movement and belongs to the genre of history painting. Currently located at the Goya Museum in Castres, France, the artwork portrays a large assembly within a dimly lit, grand hall. The composition is dominated by a central tribunal, illuminated by a shaft of light from a tall window, highlighting the intense atmosphere of the historical scene.

291. The Kite

The Kite
  • Artwork Name: The Kite
  • Year: 1777 - 1778
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 269 x 285 cm

The artwork, titled "The Kite," was created by Francisco Goya between 1777 and 1778 using oil paint on canvas. It is an example of Romanticism and falls under the genre of genre painting. Measuring 269 x 285 cm, the artwork depicts a group of people engaging in the leisurely activity of flying a kite. The scene is set outdoors with vibrant and natural surroundings, featuring several individuals in period attire interacting with each other and their environment. In the background, architectural elements are subtly integrated with the lush foliage, capturing the idyllic essence of the moment.

292. The Last Communion of St. Joseph Calasanz

The Last Communion of St. Joseph Calasanz

"The Last Communion of St. Joseph Calasanz" is an oil painting on panel by Francisco Goya, created in 1819. It reflects the Romanticism art movement and is categorized as a religious painting. The artwork measures 43 x 33 cm and currently resides in the Musée Bonnat in Bayonne, France. The painting depicts the solemn and devout scene of St. Joseph Calasanz receiving his final communion, illustrating the pious and spiritual atmosphere of the religious ceremony, with figures surrounding him in reverence.

293. The lineage

The lineage
  • Artwork Name: The lineage
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: aquatint,etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

"The Lineage," crafted by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an artwork in the medium of aquatint, etching, and paper, measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This piece, part of the "Los Caprichos" series, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and embodies the genre of caricature. The artwork portrays a group of figures engaged in close, animated interaction, capturing a moment laden with social commentary. The meticulous etching and expressive composition serve to emphasize the satirical elements inherent in the scene, reflecting Goya's incisive critique of societal norms and behaviors of his time.

294. The Madhouse

The Madhouse
  • Artwork Name: The Madhouse
  • Year: 1812 - 1814
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 45 x 72 cm

"The Madhouse," created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1814, is an oil on canvas masterpiece belonging to the Romanticism art movement. Measuring 45 x 72 cm, this genre painting is currently housed at the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. The artwork vividly depicts a chaotic and grim scene within an asylum, capturing the despair and turbulence of the inmates. Lit by a single high window, the arched space is filled with figures in various states of distress, highlighting the darker aspects of human conditions and societal neglect.

295. The Madness of Fear

The Madness of Fear

"The Madness of Fear" is an etching on paper created by Francisco Goya between 1819 and 1823. Belonging to the Romanticism movement and falling under the genre of caricature, this artwork is part of the artist’s notable "Disperate" series. The artwork vividly depicts a haunting, shadowy figure towering over a chaotic scene of helpless humans cowering in fear, evoking a powerful sense of dread and highlighting the irrationality of hysteria. The dark and foreboding atmosphere is masterfully crafted through Goya's intricate etching technique, enhancing its dramatic and unsettling impact.

296. Woman Hitting Another Woman with a Shoe

Woman Hitting Another Woman with a Shoe

The artwork, titled "Woman Hitting Another Woman with a Shoe" by Francisco Goya, dates circa 1812-1823, and is created using wash on paper, measuring 20.5 x 14.1 cm. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is classified within the caricature genre. The piece depicts a dramatic and somewhat chaotic moment, showcasing the violent act of one woman striking another with a shoe. The background is minimalistic, emphasizing the aggressive interaction between the figures. This artwork resides in the Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

297. Woman with a Fan

Woman with a Fan
  • Artwork Name: Woman with a Fan
  • Year: c.1805
  • Medium: oil,canvas
  • Dimensions: 84 x 103 cm

"Woman with a Fan," created by Francisco Goya circa 1805, is an exquisite oil painting on canvas, measuring 84 by 103 cm, representing the Romanticism art movement. This portrait, housed in the Louvre, Paris, France, depicts a seated woman adorned in a delicate dress, holding a fan with an air of poised elegance. The artwork captures both the grace and subtlety characteristic of Goya's portraiture during this period, featuring a muted palette that underscores the subject’s dignified presence.

298. You'll see later

You'll see later
  • Artwork Name: You'll see later
  • Year: c.1816 - c.1820
  • Medium: ink,paper
  • Dimensions: 26.6 x 18.7 cm

The artwork, "You'll see later," created by Francisco Goya around 1816 to 1820, belongs to the Romanticism movement and is a caricature rendered in ink on paper, measuring 26.6 x 18.7 cm. Presently housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, this piece exhibits Goya's deft use of ink to portray a dynamic interaction between two figures. The expressive and somewhat exaggerated features are emblematic of caricature, while the somber and stark background adds to the emotional gravity typical of Romanticism. The artist's skillful application of ink brings motion and intensity to the scene, creating a compelling, visually engaging narrative.

299. Young People Laughing

Young People Laughing

The artwork titled "Young People Laughing," created by Francisco Goya between 1819 and 1823, is an oil-on-canvas piece embodying the principles of the Romanticism movement. Measuring 125 x 65.5 cm, this genre painting is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain. The artwork portrays a group of young individuals immersed in laughter, capturing a moment imbued with human emotion and interaction, characteristic of Goya's profound exploration of the human condition. The dimly lit background and muted colors foreground the expressive faces, emphasizing their jovial expressions and the shared moment of joy.

300. Young Witch Flying with a Rope

Young Witch Flying with a Rope

The artwork, titled "Young Witch Flying with a Rope," created by Francisco Goya between 1824 and 1828, is part of the Romanticism art movement and falls under the genre of caricature. This piece depicts a young witch levitating in a flowing dress, holding a rope with both hands. The whimsical and slightly exaggerated features characteristic of caricature are evident in the figure's expression and posture, reflecting Goya's insightful yet critical view of his subjects. The artwork is housed in the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Canada.

301. Young Woman with a Letter

Young Woman with a Letter

"Young Woman with a Letter," created by Francisco Goya between 1812 and 1819, is an oil on canvas painting emblematic of the Romanticism art movement. This 181 x 125 cm genre painting is housed in the Palais des Beaux-Arts de Lille in Lille, France. The artwork vividly portrays a young woman receiving a letter, encapsulating a moment of intrigue and introspection, accentuated by the use of light and shadow which is characteristic of Goya’s technique and style. The painting's detailed depiction of the figures and the nuanced expressions add depth to this romantic and narrative scene.

302. You will not escape

You will not escape

The artwork titled "You will not escape" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 21.7 x 15.2 cm. This piece is part of the "Los caprichos" series, known for its satirical and critical portrayal of societal issues, and is a notable example of the Romanticism art movement. The genre of the artwork is caricature, depicting a dramatic and unsettling scene where a woman is ensnared by grotesque, nightmarish creatures, reflecting Goya's exploration of human folly and moral corruption. The artwork is held in a private collection.

303. What Will he Die?

What Will he Die?
  • Artwork Name: What Will he Die?
  • Year: 1799
  • Medium: etching,paper
  • Dimensions: 21.5 x 15.5 cm

The artwork, titled "What Will He Die?" by Francisco Goya, was created in 1799 and belongs to the Romanticism art movement. This etching on paper measures 21.5 x 15.5 cm and is a piece of caricature art from the series "Los Caprichos." The artwork, held in a private collection, depicts a fantastical scene of a donkey in human clothes attending to a sick person while two shadowy figures loom in the background. The composition evokes a satirical and somber narrative, reflecting Goya's critical view of society.

304. When day breaks we will be off

When day breaks we will be off

The artwork titled "When day breaks we will be off" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is an etching on paper measuring 19.8 x 15.2 cm. This piece, belonging to the Romanticism movement and part of the "Los caprichos" series, is a caricature and currently resides in a private collection. The artwork depicts a group of grotesque figures under a starlit night sky, characterized by exaggerated and distorted forms, which critically reflects upon the vices and follies of society. This imagery is emblematic of Goya's satirical style and poignant commentary on human nature.

305. Where is mother going?

Where is mother going?

The artwork, "Where is mother going?" created by Francisco Goya in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper measuring 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This caricature belongs to Goya's "Los caprichos" series and is part of the Romanticism movement. The artwork depicts a fantastical scene characterized by grotesque and exaggerated figures, embodying Goya's critical view of societal norms and human nature through a satirical and often darkly comical lens.

306. Who Can Think of It?

Who Can Think of It?

The artwork titled "Who Can Think of It?" by Francisco Goya, created between 1814 and 1823, is an exemplary piece from the Romanticism art movement. Executed using wash and ink on paper, the artwork measures 20.5 x 14.2 cm and falls under the caricature genre. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, the piece visually explores human predicaments through a stark depiction of a figure bent forward, connected to what appears to be a series of mechanical links extending upwards. Goya's use of minimalistic ink wash skillfully emphasizes the dramatic and possibly satirical nature of the composition, aligning with the broader themes and emotional intensity of Romanticism.

307. Who could believe it!

Who could believe it!

The artwork titled "Who could believe it!" by Francisco Goya, created in 1799, is an aquatint and etching on paper with dimensions of 21.5 x 15.5 cm. This caricature belongs to the "Los Caprichos" series and is attributed to the Romanticism art movement. The artwork features a grotesque and dramatic scene, characteristic of Goya's incisive social commentary, exemplifying the artist's critical examination of societal follies and human nature during his time.

308. The Nude Maja

The Nude Maja
  • Artwork Name: The Nude Maja
  • Year: 1800
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 98 x 191 cm

"The Nude Maja," an oil on canvas painting completed in 1800 by Francisco Goya, is a prominent work of the Romanticism movement. Measuring 98 by 191 centimeters, the artwork eloquently captures the genre of nude painting, depicting a reclining nude female figure with remarkable realism and sensuality. Currently housed at the Museo del Prado in Madrid, this piece is a testament to Goya's mastery of portraying human form and emotion through brushstrokes and composition.

309. Yard with Lunatics

Yard with Lunatics
  • Artwork Name: Yard with Lunatics
  • Year: 1793-94
  • Medium: Oil on tinplate
  • Dimensions: 43.8 x 32.7 cm

The artwork, titled "Yard with Lunatics," was created by Francisco Goya in 1793-94. Executed using oil on tinplate, the dimensions of the artwork are 43.8 x 32.7 cm. It is currently housed in the Meadows Museum in Dallas. The piece depicts a grim and haunting scene within a confined, dimly lit courtyard, where a group of disheveled and distressed figures are portrayed in various states of delirium and despair. The composition and use of stark contrasts emphasize the harrowing conditions and the psychological intensity of the subjects, characteristic of Goya's profound, often dark, explorations of human suffering and madness.

310. Dona Teresa Sureda

Dona Teresa Sureda
  • Artwork Name: Dona Teresa Sureda
  • Year: c. 1805
  • Medium: Oil On Canvas
  • Dimensions: 47 1/8 x 31 1/4 in. (119.8 x 79.4 cm)

The artwork, titled "Dona Teresa Sureda," was created by the artist Francisco Goya around the year 1805. This oil on canvas piece measures 47 1/8 by 31 1/4 inches (119.8 by 79.4 cm) and is currently housed at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. The painting features a poised woman seated in a richly adorned wooden chair, exuding an air of quiet strength and elegance. The artist captures intricate details in her attire and the texture of the chair, contrasting her composed expression with a dark, unadorned background, thereby drawing the viewer's focus onto her serene visage.

311. Portrait Of Mariana Waldstein

Portrait Of Mariana Waldstein

The artwork, titled "Portrait Of Mariana Waldstein," was created by Francisco Goya between 1797 and 1799. Executed in oil on canvas, the painting measures 56 by 38 1/4 inches (142 x 97 cm) and is currently housed at the Musée du Louvre in Paris. The painting portrays Mariana Waldstein standing outdoors, adorned in a dark, elegant dress complemented by a pink headpiece, set against a subtle, atmospheric landscape. The elegance and refined detail of the subject's attire, along with the serene backdrop, exemplify Goya's masterful technique and his ability to imbue his portraits with a sense of presence and personality.

312. Majas On A Balcony

Majas On A Balcony
  • Artwork Name: Majas On A Balcony
  • Year: c. 1808-1812
  • Medium: Oil On Canvas
  • Dimensions: 162 x 107 cm

The artwork, titled "Majas On A Balcony," is an oil on canvas painting created by the renowned artist Francisco Goya between circa 1808 and 1812. Measuring 162 by 107 centimeters, this piece is part of a private collection. The painting portrays two elegantly dressed women, known as majas, standing together on a balcony. Behind them, two shadowy male figures are visible. The composition is characterized by the intricate detailing of the women's garments and the contrasting play of light and shadow, creating a dramatic and intimate scene.

313. Two Young People Laughing At A Man

Two Young People Laughing At A Man

The artwork, titled "Two Young People Laughing At A Man," was created by Francisco Goya between 1820-1823. This piece is an oil on plaster remounted on canvas and measures 125 by 66 cm. It is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork portrays two young figures engaged in laughter, seemingly at the expense of a man, casting them in dramatic, shadowed lighting that emphasizes their expressions and the textures of their garments, evoking a sense of both amusement and melancholic undertone typical to Goya's later works.

314. Desgracias Acaecidas En El Tendido De La Plaza De Madrid, Y Muerte Del Alcalde De Torrejon

Desgracias Acaecidas En El Tendido De La Plaza De Madrid, Y Muerte Del Alcalde De Torrejon

The artwork, titled "Desgracias Acaecidas En El Tendido De La Plaza De Madrid, Y Muerte Del Alcalde De Torrejon," was created by Francisco Goya during the years 1815-16. Executed as an etching with aquatint, it measures 24.5 by 35.5 centimeters. The artwork vividly depicts the chaos and tragedy in a bullring in Madrid, highlighting a tragic event that led to the death of the Mayor of Torrejon. Amidst the pandemonium, a bull is seen overpowering the frenzied crowd, rendering a powerful and emotive scene of turmoil and desperation.

315. Que Se Rompe La Cuerda!

Que Se Rompe La Cuerda!

The artwork, titled "Que Se Rompe La Cuerda!" and created by Francisco Goya around 1815, is an etching with aquatint measuring 17.5 x 22 cm. The piece depicts a tense scene where a man appears to be precariously balancing on a tightrope above a crowd of onlookers. The detailed shading and expressive lines emphasize the drama and imminent danger of the situation, capturing the audience's concern and the performer's focus and precariousness.

316. The Procession

The Procession
  • Artwork Name: The Procession
  • Year: c. 1816
  • Medium: Oil On Panel
  • Dimensions: 46 x 73 cm

"The Procession" is an oil on panel artwork by Francisco Goya, created circa 1816. Measuring 46 x 73 cm, this painting is part of the collection at the Royal Academy of San Fernando in Madrid. The artwork depicts a somber religious procession, with penitents clad in white garments and conical hats, carrying religious icons amidst a crowd of onlookers. Dark robed figures stand in the foreground, while the backdrop features a large structure and a clear, expansive sky, contributing to the dramatic intensity and solemnity of the scene.

317. Little Giants

Little Giants
  • Artwork Name: Little Giants
  • Year: 1791-2
  • Medium: Oil On Canvas
  • Dimensions: 137 x 104 cm

The artwork "Little Giants" by Francisco Goya, created during 1791-1792, is an oil on canvas painting with dimensions of 137 by 104 cm. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, the piece showcases Goya's adept use of color and composition to depict a scene of children engaged in playful antics. The central figure, a child in vibrant attire, is elevated by two others, embodying a sense of joy and camaraderie against a subtly rendered outdoor backdrop. This work reflects Goya's ability to capture natural human emotions and interactions within a harmonious and expressive visual narrative.

318. El Si Pronuncian Y La Mano Alargan Al Primero Que Llega

El Si Pronuncian Y La Mano Alargan Al Primero Que Llega

The artwork titled "El Si Pronuncian Y La Mano Alargan Al Primero Que Llega," created by Francisco Goya in 1797-98, is rendered using the medium of etching with aquatint and measures 21.8 x 15.4 cm. The piece depicts a central female figure, positioned among masked and grotesque characters, as she extends her hand in acceptance towards another figure. The dark, textured background and the expressive, detailed lines contribute to the ominous and satirical tone of the scene, reflecting Goya’s critical perspective on social and moral issues of his time.

319. Self-portrait

Self-portrait
  • Artwork Name: Self-portrait
  • Year: c.1770 - c.1775
  • Medium: Oil on Panel
  • Dimensions: 58 x 44 cm

The artwork, titled "Self-portrait," was created by Francisco Goya between 1770 and 1775 using oil on panel and is associated with the Romanticism movement. The dimensions of the painting are 58 by 44 centimeters, and it is housed in the Royal Academy of San Fernando in Madrid. As a self-portrait, the artwork presents an introspective portrayal of the artist, featuring a young Goya with a solemn and contemplative expression. The use of darker tones and softened brush strokes accentuates the depth and character of the artist, emblematic of the Romantic era's emphasis on emotion and individuality.

320. The Forge

The Forge
  • Artwork Name: The Forge
  • Year: c.1812 - c.1816
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 181.6 x 125 cm

"The Forge," an oil-on-canvas artwork by Francisco Goya, created circa 1812-1816, epitomizes the Romanticism art movement and is classified as a genre painting. The artwork, measuring 181.6 by 125 cm, is currently housed in the Frick Collection in New York City. The artwork depicts three blacksmiths engaged in the intense labor of forging metal, with raw kinetic energy emanating from their exertions. The use of chiaroscuro emphasizes the muscular forms of the figures and highlights the determination and cooperation evident in their toiling figures.

321. Fight with Cudgels

Fight with Cudgels
  • Artwork Name: Fight with Cudgels
  • Year: 1820 - 1823
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 123 x 266 cm

"Fight with Cudgels," an oil on canvas painting by Francisco Goya, created between 1820 and 1823, is preserved in the Museo del Prado, Madrid. This genre painting, measuring 123 x 266 cm, is part of Goya's renowned "Black Paintings" series and falls within the Romanticism movement. The artwork depicts a violent and intense encounter between two figures wielding cudgels, set against the backdrop of a desolate landscape under a turbulent sky, capturing the raw and dramatic emotions characteristic of Goya's later works.

322. The Colossus

The Colossus
  • Artwork Name: The Colossus
  • Year: 1808 - 1812
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 116 x 105 cm

"The Colossus," an oil on canvas painting by Francisco Goya, exemplifies the Romanticism movement and dates back to the years 1808 to 1812. This mythological painting, measuring 116 x 105 cm, is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork depicts a gigantic figure, towering over a dark, tumultuous landscape filled with diminutive, fleeing figures and animals, invoking a sense of awe and chaos.

323. Crucified Christ

Crucified Christ
  • Artwork Name: Crucified Christ
  • Year: 1780
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 255 x 154 cm

The artwork, titled "Crucified Christ," was created by Francisco Goya in 1780 using oil on canvas. It is a notable piece within the Romanticism art movement, distinguished by its religious genre. The painting, measuring 255 x 154 cm, depicts a poignant representation of Christ's crucifixion, showcasing Goya's skill in evoking emotion and devotion through his use of light and anatomical precision. This significant work is housed at the Museo del Prado in Madrid.

324. Inquisition Scene

Inquisition Scene
  • Artwork Name: Inquisition Scene
  • Year: 1812 - 1819
  • Medium: Oil on Panel
  • Dimensions: 46 x 73 cm

The artwork, titled "Inquisition Scene" by Francisco Goya, dates from 1812 to 1819 and is executed in oil on panel. Measuring 46 x 73 cm, it belongs to the Romanticism movement and is classified as a history painting. The artwork is housed in the Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando in Madrid, Spain. The scene depicted vividly portrays an inquisition, featuring grim, imposing figures wearing pointed capirote hats in a dark, oppressive setting, suggesting a somber and judgmental atmosphere reflective of the historical events and mores of that era.

325. Leocadia

Leocadia
  • Artwork Name: Leocadia
  • Year: 1819 - 1823
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 147.5 x 129.4 cm

"Leocadia," created by Francisco Goya between 1819 and 1823, is an oil on canvas painting that measures 147.5 x 129.4 cm and belongs to the Romanticism movement. This portrait is part of Goya's renowned Black Paintings series and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork depicts a contemplative female figure, dressed in dark, flowing garments, leaning on a surface with a pensive expression. The background, characterized by somber and swirling tones, reflects a profound emotional depth typical of Goya's late works.

326. Men Reading

Men Reading
  • Artwork Name: Men Reading
  • Year: 1819 - 1823
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas,gesso
  • Dimensions: 126 x 66 cm

"Men Reading" is an evocative genre painting by Francisco Goya, created between 1819 and 1823 as part of his "Black Paintings" series. This oil on canvas artwork, which also employs gesso, represents the Romanticism art movement and measures 126 by 66 centimeters. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, the painting depicts a group of men intently reading a document, rendered in Goya's characteristic somber tones and dramatic chiaroscuro, reflecting the intellectual intensity and moody atmosphere of his later works.

327. The Clothed Maja

The Clothed Maja
  • Artwork Name: The Clothed Maja
  • Year: 1800
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 95 x 190 cm

"The Clothed Maja," created by the renowned artist Francisco Goya in 1800, is a captivating oil on canvas portrait that epitomizes the Romanticism art movement. Measuring 95 by 190 cm, the artwork portrays a reclining female figure adorned in elegant, delicate attire, resting gracefully on a luxurious settee. The piece, celebrated for its intricate detail and emotive expression, is currently housed in the illustrious Museo del Prado in Madrid.

328. The Swing

The Swing
  • Artwork Name: The Swing
  • Year: 1796 - 1797
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 169 x 100 cm

"The Swing," created by Francisco Goya during 1796-1797, is a genre painting in the Romanticism art movement, rendered in oil on canvas with dimensions of 169 x 100 cm. The artwork is housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. It depicts a joyful scene of a woman on a swing, buoyantly suspended in the air while a man helps propel her higher, capturing a moment of exuberant leisure. The expressive poses and facial expressions, coupled with the soft, fluid brushstrokes, exemplify Goya's ability to convey emotion and movement, hallmark traits of Romanticism.

329. Marquesa de la Solana

Marquesa de la Solana

The artwork, titled "Marquesa de la Solana," is an oil on canvas painting created by Francisco Goya around 1794-1795. Measuring 183 by 124 centimeters, this piece is housed in the Musée du Louvre in Paris. The painting exhibits a refined depiction of a woman of noble status, characterized by her elegant attire, gentle facial expression, and poised demeanor. Adorning a delicate veil, her figure is accentuated by a wide, dark skirt, while her feet are clothed in intricate footwear, symbolizing both her grace and social standing.

330. Two Old Women Eating from a Bowl

Two Old Women Eating from a Bowl

"Two Old Women Eating from a Bowl," created by Francisco Goya between 1821 and 1823, is an oil on plaster work that has been remounted on canvas. The painting measures 21 by 33 1/2 inches and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork depicts two elderly women in an intimate, dimly-lit setting, where one figure is using a spoon to eat from a bowl while engaging with the other. The sombre tones and expressive brushwork contribute to the evocative and poignant mood of the scene.

331. Manuel Osorio de Zuniga DETAIL of cats and bird

Manuel Osorio de Zuniga DETAIL of cats and bird

The artwork "Manuel Osorio de Zuniga" by Francisco Goya, created around 1788, is an oil on canvas painting measuring 127 x 101 cm. Currently housed at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, this piece features a detailed depiction of a vivid scene involving two cats and a bird. The cats' intense, wide-eyed gazes are fixed on the bird, which holds a card in its beak, creating a tension-filled moment captured with masterful precision and lifelike realism by the artist.

332. Que se la llevaron!

Que se la llevaron!
  • Artwork Name: Que se la llevaron!
  • Year: 1797
  • Medium: Etching, aquatint and drypoint
  • Dimensions: 21.8 x 15.3 cm

"Que se la llevaron!" is an artwork created by Francisco Goya in 1797, employing the techniques of etching, aquatint, and drypoint. The dimensions of the artwork are 21.8 by 15.3 cm. The artwork depicts a dynamic and intense scene, where one figure is seen carrying another, evoking a sense of urgency and struggle. The composition is characterized by its stark contrast and dramatic use of light and shadow, achieved through the meticulous application of Goya's chosen mediums. The expressions and postures of the figures convey a narrative that invites viewers to ponder the circumstances and emotions depicted.

333. Esto es peor

Esto es peor
  • Artwork Name: Esto es peor
  • Year: c. 1812-13
  • Medium: Etching with lavis
  • Dimensions: 15.7 x 20.7 cm

The artwork, titled "Esto es peor," created by Francisco Goya around 1812-13, measures 15.7 x 20.7 cm and is executed using etching with lavis technique. The piece depicts a harrowing scene where a naked figure is gruesomely impaled on a tree trunk, while soldiers in the background either observe or engage in the act. This stark and haunting imagery exemplifies Goya's commentary on the brutalities and horrors of war, rendered in his distinct graphic style.

334. Prison Interior

Prison Interior
  • Artwork Name: Prison Interior
  • Year: c. 1810-14
  • Medium: Oil on tinplate
  • Dimensions: 42.9 x 31.7 cm

"Prison Interior," created by Francisco Goya circa 1810-1814, is an evocative oil on tinplate painting measuring 42.9 by 31.7 centimeters. Currently housed in the Bowes Museum in Barnard Castle, the artwork portrays a dimly lit, somber prison scene where several figures are depicted in various states of despair and confinement. The interplay of light and shadow is striking, creating a sense of isolation and human suffering. This poignant representation points to Goya's broader themes of human misery and the darker aspects of societal institutions.

335. Que sacrificio!

Que sacrificio!
  • Artwork Name: Que sacrificio!
  • Year: 1797-98
  • Medium: Etching with aquatint
  • Dimensions: 20.1 x 15.1 cm

The artwork, titled "¡Que sacrificio!" by Francisco Goya, created in 1797-98, is an etching with aquatint measuring 20.1 x 15.1 cm. The composition presents a poignant scene where a young woman, donned in a flowing dress, stands to the right, her head bowed slightly and eyes closed, exuding a sense of resignation or melancholy. Surrounding her are several grotesque figures; one of them, positioned lower with a hunched posture and patterned attire, leans forward with an exaggerated, almost simian, grin, emphasizing the satirical nature of Goya's social commentary. The somber tones and meticulous detail in the etching underscore the themes of sacrifice and societal expectations captured in this powerful work.

336. Isabel de Porcel

Isabel de Porcel
  • Artwork Name: Isabel de Porcel
  • Year: 1804-05
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 82 x 54 cm

The artwork "Isabel de Porcel," crafted by Francisco Goya between 1804 and 1805, is an oil on canvas masterpiece measuring 82 x 54 cm. Currently housed at the National Gallery in London, the artwork portrays a woman garbed in a traditional Spanish mantilla and black lace shawl, exuding a sense of nobility and grace. The sitter's serene yet commanding demeanor is accentuated by the rich, dark drapery and the subtle play of light and shadow, characteristic of Goya's meticulous technique and his ability to capture the psychological depth of his subjects.

337. Strolling Players

Strolling Players

The artwork "Strolling Players," created by Francisco Goya in 1793, is an oil on canvas piece measuring 43 by 32 centimeters. Situated within the Romanticism movement, this genre painting is housed at the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The composition depicts a lively scene of strolling entertainers, with performers dressed in colorful and elaborate costumes, engaging with one another on a makeshift stage against a muted, atmospheric backdrop. The intricate details and dynamic postures of the figures reflect Goya's keen observation of human expression and interaction, embodying the essence of theatrical performance in the late 18th century.

338. Self-portrait with Dr Arrieta

Self-portrait with Dr Arrieta

"Self-portrait with Dr. Arrieta," created in 1820 by Francisco Goya, is an oil on canvas work belonging to the Romanticism art movement. This 117 cm by 79 cm portrait, housed in the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, depicts a poignant scene where Goya portrays himself in a moment of illness, being attended to by his physician, Dr. Arrieta, who is offering comfort and assistance. The somber mood is rendered with mastery, capturing the depth of human vulnerability and empathy, characteristic of Romanticism's focus on intense emotional expression.

339. Countess of Chinchón

Countess of Chinchón

The artwork, titled "Countess of Chinchón," is a portrait by Francisco Goya, created between 1797 and 1800 in the medium of oil on canvas. Measuring 140 by 220 cm, this piece embodies the Romanticism art movement. Presently housed in the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy, the artwork depicts a modestly clothed woman of stature, adorned in a light, flowing dress embellished with fine details and delicate accessories, against a stark, dark background, highlighting her elegance and poise.

340. Bartolome Sureda y Miserol

Bartolome Sureda y Miserol

The artwork titled "Bartolome Sureda y Miserol" is an oil on canvas created by Francisco Goya circa 1803-04. It measures 119.7 x 79.4 cm and is housed in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. The piece portrays a man with an expressive face, adorned in a high-collared shirt and a sophisticated jacket, indicative of early 19th-century fashion. Goya's masterful technique is evident in the lifelike rendering and emotive quality of the subject, exemplifying his exceptional ability to capture human character and depth.

341. The Giant

The Giant
  • Artwork Name: The Giant
  • Year: 1818
  • Dimensions: 11 1/2 x 8 1/4 in. (29.2 x 21 cm)

The artwork in question is titled "The Giant," created by the renowned artist Francisco Goya in 1818. It measures 11 1/2 by 8 1/4 inches (29.2 x 21 cm) and is currently housed at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, New York, USA. The piece depicts a monumental, shadowy figure seated against a dark and nebulous background, invoking a sense of mystery and foreboding. The looming presence of the giant, contrasted with the sparse use of light and shadow, speaks to Goya's mastery in creating atmospheres that provoke contemplation and evoke powerful emotions.

342. Blind Guitarist

Blind Guitarist
  • Artwork Name: Blind Guitarist
  • Year: c.1778
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 260 x 311 cm

"Blind Guitarist," created by the acclaimed artist Francisco Goya circa 1778, is an oil-on-canvas masterpiece that resides in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork measures 260 x 311 cm and is a distinguished example of the genre painting style within the Romanticism art movement. The artwork depicts a lively, detailed street scene where a group of visually rich characters, under a tree's shade, are seemingly captivated by a central blind guitarist. The composition and lighting, coupled with the artist's attention to expressive human gestures, eloquently reflect the Romanticism movement's focus on emotion and contemplation.

343. Burial of the Sardine

Burial of the Sardine

"Burial of the Sardine," created by Francisco Goya around 1816, is an oil painting on a panel measuring 82.5 by 62 centimeters. The artwork resides in the Royal Academy of San Fernando in Madrid. It depicts the fantastical and lively atmosphere of a traditional Spanish festival, featuring a crowd of revelers in festive garb, with a jovial and almost grotesque banner at the center. The scene is replete with dynamic figures engaging in various joyful and exuberant activities, conveying a sense of communal merriment against a backdrop of dramatic skies and towering trees.

344. Contra el bien general

Contra el bien general

"Contra el bien general," an etching on paper by Francisco Goya dating from circa 1810 to circa 1815, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and the series "The Disasters of War." This caricature, measuring 17.7 by 22.1 centimeters, depicts a sinister figure with bat-like wings, bent over a large book and symbolizing nefarious forces working against the common good. The artwork exemplifies Goya's critical perspective on the social and political turmoil of his time.

345. Duchess of Alba

Duchess of Alba
  • Artwork Name: Duchess of Alba
  • Year: 1797
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 210 x 148 cm

The artwork, titled "Duchess of Alba" by Francisco Goya, created in 1797, exemplifies the Romanticism movement and is rendered in oil on canvas. Measuring 210 by 148 centimeters, this portrait captures the Duchess of Alba in a striking black dress with a vivid red sash, posed against a serene natural landscape. The artwork is housed in the Hispanic Society of America in New York City, NY, US.

346. Family of Carlos IV

Family of Carlos IV

The artwork, titled "Family of Carlos IV," is a majestic portrait by Francisco Goya, created in 1800 using oil on canvas. This masterpiece, measuring 280 x 336 cm, belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork depicts the royal family of Carlos IV in a formal and detailed manner, showcasing the intricate clothing and dignified expressions of each family member. The rich use of color and light reflects the grandeur and sophistication of the Spanish court during that era.

347. Manuel Osorio de Zuniga

Manuel Osorio de Zuniga

The artwork "Manuel Osorio de Zuniga," created by Francisco Goya around 1787, is an oil on canvas painting that embodies the Romanticism art movement. Measuring 127 x 101.6 cm, this portrait features a young boy dressed in a striking red suit with white lace accents. He stands with a serene expression, holding a string attached to a magpie that grasps a letter, while three curious cats and a birdcage with several birds are depicted at his feet. The painting is housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, NY, US, and exemplifies Goya's skill in capturing the innocence and curiosity of childhood within a meticulously detailed composition.

348. Maria Teresa de Borbon y Vallabriga

Maria Teresa de Borbon y Vallabriga

The artwork titled "Maria Teresa de Borbon y Vallabriga," painted by Francisco Goya in 1783, is an oil on canvas piece measuring 132.3 by 116.7 cm. Currently housed at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., this painting portrays a young girl, standing with poise and elegance against a backdrop of serene mountains and dense foliage. She is adorned in a refined blue and black dress with intricate lace detailing, and a delicate veil and headpiece. Beside her stands a small, white dog, adding a further touch of charm and innocence to the composition. The combination of the subject's composed demeanor, the lush landscape, and the meticulous detailing attests to Goya's masterful ability to capture both the nobility and the natural beauty of his time.

349. Saturn

Saturn
  • Artwork Name: Saturn
  • Year: 1819 - 1823
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 83 x 146 cm

The artwork "Saturn" by Francisco Goya, created between 1819 and 1823, is an oil on canvas piece distinguished by its dimensions of 83 x 146 cm. It belongs to the Romanticism art movement and is a mythological painting from Goya's "Black Paintings" series, which he painted during the same period. Currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid, the artwork depicts the harrowing scene of the Roman god Saturn devouring one of his children, characterized by its dark palette and intense emotional expression.

350. Spring (or The Flower Girls)

Spring (or The Flower Girls)

The artwork, titled "Spring (or The Flower Girls)" by Francisco Goya, was created in the years 1786-1787 using oil on canvas. It measures 277 by 192 cm and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The composition captures a serene outdoor scene wherein a group of figures, rendered with delicate and precise brushwork, appear engaged in the act of gathering flowers. The lush landscape backdrop, with its rolling hills and tall greenery, complements the gentle, pastoral theme, embodying the essence of spring and the beauty of nature.

351. St Francis Borja at the Deathbed of an Impenitent

St Francis Borja at the Deathbed of an Impenitent

The artwork, "St Francis Borja at the Deathbed of an Impenitent," created by Francisco Goya in 1788, is an oil on canvas painting measuring 350 x 300 cm and is located in the Cathedral of Valencia. The artwork depicts a dramatic scene at the deathbed of an impenitent, vividly illustrating the conflict between good and evil. St. Francis Borja is shown holding a crucifix in a gesture of spiritual intervention, while the impenitent lies in bed surrounded by ominous figures, signifying the torments of damnation. The scene is set in a dimly lit room with a round window casting a faint light, contributing to the composition's intense and somber atmosphere.

352. The Milkmaid

The Milkmaid
  • Artwork Name: The Milkmaid
  • Year: 1825-27
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 74 x 68 cm

"The Milkmaid," created by Francisco Goya between 1825 and 1827, is an oil on canvas masterpiece measuring 74 by 68 centimeters. The artwork is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The painting depicts a milkmaid who is elegantly adorned with a shawl, capturing a moment of serene introspection. With a softly illuminated background, Goya's deft brushwork and subtle use of light and shadow highlight the delicate features of the subject, evoking a sense of gentle contemplation and calmness.

353. Time

Time
  • Artwork Name: Time
  • Year: c. 1810-12
  • Medium: Oil on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 181 x 125 cm

The artwork titled "Time" by Francisco Goya, created circa 1810-12, is an oil on canvas measuring 181 x 125 cm and is housed at the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Lille. The piece portrays a skeletal figure with haunting features, holding a sign inscribed with "Que tal?". The dark, expressive brushstrokes convey a sense of decay and the passage of time, characteristic of Goya's later works, which often explore themes of mortality and the human condition.

354. Tu que no puedes

Tu que no puedes
  • Artwork Name: Tu que no puedes
  • Year: 1797-98
  • Medium: Etching with aquatint
  • Dimensions: 20.7 x 15.1 cm

The artwork titled "Tu que no puedes" by Francisco Goya, created between 1797 and 1798, is an etching with aquatint measuring 20.7 x 15.1 cm. The artwork depicts a surreal and somewhat comical scene featuring two individuals futilely attempting to lift a large donkey on their shoulders. The donkey appears indifferent, adding to the absurdity of the situation. This piece, like many of Goya's works, likely contains a deeper satirical commentary on societal issues, conveyed through its meticulously rendered details and expressive composition.

355. Two Old Men

Two Old Men
  • Artwork Name: Two Old Men
  • Year: c. 1821-1823
  • Medium: Oil on plaster remounted on Canvas
  • Dimensions: 144 x 66 cm

The artwork, titled "Two Old Men," created by Francisco Goya circa 1821-1823, is an oil on plaster remounted on canvas composition. Measuring 144 by 66 cm, this poignant piece is housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The painting features two elderly figures, rendered with somber tones and dramatic lighting, showcasing Goya's masterful use of depth and emotion.

356. Duchess of Alba DETAIL of face

Duchess of Alba DETAIL of face

The artwork, titled "Duchess of Alba," is a detailed portrayal of the Duchess' face, masterfully rendered by the esteemed artist Francisco Goya in 1797. Created using oil on canvas, the artwork's dimensions are 210.2 by 149.3 centimeters. This significant piece is housed in the Hispanic Society of America, located in New York, NY. The artwork captures the profound and expressive features of the Duchess with meticulous attention to detail, highlighting the artist's exceptional skill in portraiture.

357. Duchess of Alba DETAIL of hand showing rings

Duchess of Alba DETAIL of hand showing rings

The artwork, titled "Duchess of Alba DETAIL of hand showing rings," is an oil on canvas creation by Francisco Goya from the year 1797. Measuring 210.2 x 149.3 cm, it is housed in the Hispanic Society of America in New York, NY. This detailed section of Goya's larger portrait meticulously captures the elegance and aristocratic stature of the Duchess of Alba, emphasizing her adorned hand with intricate rings, which are emblematic of her noble status and the opulence of her era. The precision in the depiction of the hand and the rings reflects Goya's mastery in portraiture and attention to intricate details.

358. Duchess of Alba DETAIL of shoes

Duchess of Alba DETAIL of shoes

The artwork, titled "Duchess of Alba DETAIL of shoes," is an oil on canvas masterpiece created by Francisco Goya in 1797. This particular piece measures 210.2 by 149.3 centimeters and is part of the collection at the Hispanic Society of America in New York, NY. The artwork features a close-up detail of the Duchess of Alba’s shoes, showcasing the intricacy and elegance of the footwear and providing insight into the fashion and aesthetic sensibilities of the period. The artist's attention to detail and the texture of the materials exemplify Goya's skill and artistry.

359. The Great He-Goat or Witches Sabbath

The Great He-Goat or Witches Sabbath

"The Great He-Goat or Witches Sabbath," created by Francisco Goya between 1821 and 1823, is an oil on plaster work later remounted on canvas, measuring 140 by 438 centimeters. This artwork is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The painting portrays a dark, enigmatic scene in which a group of figures, displaying varied and expressive countenances, gathers around a centrally positioned horned goat, likely symbolizing the devil. The atmosphere is charged with an aura of mysticism and foreboding, capturing the eerie and sinister ambiance of a witches' sabbath through Goya's masterful use of shadow and composition.

360. The Dog

The Dog
  • Artwork Name: The Dog
  • Year: c.1819
  • Medium: oil,plaster,Canvas
  • Dimensions: 80 x 134 cm

"The Dog," created by Francisco Goya circa 1819, is an evocative oil on plaster and canvas artwork belonging to the Romanticism movement and categorized as a genre painting. Measuring 80 x 134 cm, the artwork forms part of Goya's renowned "Black Paintings" series (1819-1823) and is currently housed in the Museo del Prado in Madrid. The artwork depicts a dog's head in the lower central part, appearing against a vast expanse of muted, earthy tones. The composition evokes a sense of isolation and despair, characteristic of the brooding introspections that mark Goya's later works.

361. The Shootings of May Third 1808

The Shootings of May Third 1808

"The Shootings of May Third 1808", an oil on canvas painting by Francisco Goya, created in 1814, measures 104 3/4 x 136 inches and is housed in the Museo del Prado, Madrid. This work is associated with the Expressionist movement, though it is often considered part of Romanticism. The artwork portrays a night scene illuminated by a lantern, featuring a group of Spanish civilians facing a firing squad of French soldiers against a backdrop of a cityscape. The vivid depiction of fear, despair, and defiance captures a poignant moment of human suffering and resistance, characteristic of Goya’s profound commentary on the brutal realities of war.

362. El sueno de la razon produce monstruos

El sueno de la razon produce monstruos

The artwork titled "El sueño de la razón produce monstruos," created by Francisco Goya between 1797-98, is an etching with aquatint measuring 21.6 x 15.2 cm. Although the movement and location information provided seems inconsistent (Northern Renaissance and Milan, Italy), the artwork is well-known for its mythological connotations. The artwork features a man slumped over a desk, seemingly asleep, surrounded by nightmarish creatures such as owls and bats, symbolizing the haunting repercussions when reason is abandoned. It belongs to a unique artistic series, though the mention of "Mont Sainte-Victoire" is likely erroneous since this typically refers to a series by another artist. The overall tone of the piece evokes a sense of eerie surrealism.

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